Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

So many executive orders, so much twitter. What to do? Well, discuss it here for one...

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highdesert
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#51 Post by highdesert » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:42 pm

Just 17 days until the UK is scheduled to exit the EU and in London parliament today again refused the approve Theresa May's exit agreement she signed in November 2018 with the EU. There is now serious talk that the Conservative Party will force May to resign and elect a new leader. There isn't a clear candidate to replace May though Jeremy Hunt and Amber Rudd are two options being discussed.

The Labour Party isn't an option for many while Jeremy Corbyn is party leader. Corbyn who is clinging to Brexit while Labour members support a new referendum and the anti-semitism scandal that he hasn't faced are just two of the reasons he'd be a disaster in #10. Earlier this month 8 Labour MPs left the party and were joined by three Conservative MPs who left the Tories, they are calling themselves the Independent Group and will probably form a new party, it's possible other Tories will join the group.
Parliament’s rejection of Mrs. May’s deal shifts the focus to a vote scheduled for Wednesday on whether to oppose leaving without a deal. After Tuesday’s vote, the prime minister said she would not try to dictate to her party’s members how to vote on Wednesday. “This will be a free vote on this side of the house,” she said.

A vote against a no-deal Brexit would most likely require pushing back the originally scheduled departure date of March 29, and Parliament is scheduled to vote Thursday on whether to seek a postponement. Some hard-line Brexiteers insist that they would welcome a no-deal split as a clean and complete break from the European Union. But it is clear that most members of Parliament see it as more akin to driving over a cliff. Formal opposition in Parliament to a no-deal departure would ratchet up pressure on the government to seek a postponement of the deadline, something that would be contingent on an agreement between Mrs. May’s government and the European Union.

Michel Barnier, the bloc’s chief Brexit negotiator, reiterated its position that delay or no delay, the European Union was not prepared to make more concessions. “The E.U. has done everything it can to help get the Withdrawal Agreement over the line,” he wrote on Twitter. The British government could evade the March 29 deadline unilaterally, but only by revoking its decision to leave the European Union, a step that Mrs. May has insisted she will not take. But postponing or revoking Britain’s departure would give new hope to those who want to call a second referendum.

The 2016 referendum won with 52 percent of the vote, but Brexit opponents hope that circumstances have changed enough to reverse the result.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/worl ... -vote.html
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#52 Post by YankeeTarheel » Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:20 pm

At least we still have ONE major party that both remembers its principles and hasn't split in two. Compared to the UK we're not in as bad shape.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#53 Post by featureless » Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:25 pm

YankeeTarheel wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:20 pm
At least we still have ONE major party that both remembers its principles and hasn't split in two. Compared to the UK we're not in as bad shape.
Which party do you speak of? The corporate Democrats?

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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#54 Post by YankeeTarheel » Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:28 pm

Well, not the CheetoTrumplicans!
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#55 Post by K9s » Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:28 am

I thought the Brits were going to consider both a delay and a re-vote? They seriously need to vote again. This is too important.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#56 Post by Bisbee » Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:54 am

You mean a new referendum for whether to leave the E.U. or not? I agree that they should do this. Brexit will likely fail if they do.

I wish we could have a do-over for our 2016 fiasco.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#57 Post by highdesert » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:49 am

Bisbee wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:54 am
You mean a new referendum for whether to leave the E.U. or not? I agree that they should do this. Brexit will likely fail if they do.

I wish we could have a do-over for our 2016 fiasco.
Yes, a new referendum on leaving the EU is one of the possibilities. The British newspapers tore into Theresa May over yesterdays vote.
Wednesday's newspapers are dominated by the news that MPs rejected Theresa May's Brexit deal for a second time.

"How much more of this can Britain take?" asks the Daily Express, while "May loses control of Brexit" is the headline in the Financial Times.

The Guardian says MPs inflicted a fresh blow to the prime minister's "shattered authority" when they again voted against her Brexit plan.

The Daily Mirror calls her defeat "humiliating", and says it now looks like Brexit will be delayed. [The right wing Mail called the House of Commons the "house of fools".]

The HuffPost UK website says the EU has demanded a "credible justification" before it can grant any delay request. This, the website says, suggests Mrs May might have to pivot to a softer deal or call an election or referendum.

The Times says the rejection of the PM's plan darkened the mood of EU leaders, who are due to meet next week for a summit. A diplomat tells the paper that some behind the scenes are prepared to cut Britain loose.

The Sun calls them a "parliament of pygmies" who "calamitously let down the nation".

The Express accuses "wrecking Remainers" of rendering the vote of more than 17 million people "meaningless".

But the FT argues MPs must now take control to avoid political chaos and create space for a re-think.

The Daily Mail is one of several papers to speculate about how much longer Mrs May can survive as prime minister.

The Times and the Mirror say she's on borrowed time.

A writer in the Daily Telegraph, Allison Pearson, argues the UK needs "a bold new leader" who can enter EU negotiations with "guts, vision and fire in their belly".
https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-the-papers-47548482
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#58 Post by YankeeTarheel » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:59 am

Corbyn and May have BOTH managed to alienate both the left and right wings of their respective parties and many are actually defecting to the other parties like the Liberal Democrats. Corbyn's blatant anti-Semitism has disgusted many life-long Labour supporters, and May's ability to manage the Conservatives makes Paul Ryan look like a virtuoso, rather than the weak, lost, flailing incompetent he was!

Only the racists, the ignorant, and few with corporate interests actually believe Brexit will benefit the UK. They were LIED to that they could have all the benefits of EU membership without the costs and being able to selectively block those trade openings they didn't like. It NEVER occurred to them it would shut the Irish Republic border, tight! Actually, the ONLY real beneficiary of Brexit is, naturally, Putin!

I spoke to a long-time friend via FB messenger over the weekend. Know her over 40 years and she's TERRIFIED because her husband is Dutch with a Netherlands citizenship and passport. It's not as obvious as it should be that married couples won't be separated, that he will still be allowed to work and remain with his English wife in the UK and not forced to leave. She even said she's ashamed of her nation, the first time since I know her.

She's totally against Brexit, realizing, beyond her own personal interests that it was a catastrophic idea. And it is.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#59 Post by highdesert » Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:24 am

YankeeTarheel wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:59 am
Corbyn and May have BOTH managed to alienate both the left and right wings of their respective parties and many are actually defecting to the other parties like the Liberal Democrats. Corbyn's blatant anti-Semitism has disgusted many life-long Labour supporters, and May's ability to manage the Conservatives makes Paul Ryan look like a virtuoso, rather than the weak, lost, flailing incompetent he was!

Only the racists, the ignorant, and few with corporate interests actually believe Brexit will benefit the UK. They were LIED to that they could have all the benefits of EU membership without the costs and being able to selectively block those trade openings they didn't like. It NEVER occurred to them it would shut the Irish Republic border, tight! Actually, the ONLY real beneficiary of Brexit is, naturally, Putin!

I spoke to a long-time friend via FB messenger over the weekend. Know her over 40 years and she's TERRIFIED because her husband is Dutch with a Netherlands citizenship and passport. It's not as obvious as it should be that married couples won't be separated, that he will still be allowed to work and remain with his English wife in the UK and not forced to leave. She even said she's ashamed of her nation, the first time since I know her.

She's totally against Brexit, realizing, beyond her own personal interests that it was a catastrophic idea. And it is.
Two or more Commons votes will be held this week. Theresa May's days are numbered, she survived the no-confidence vote last month but the beauty of the parliamentary system is that the party can dump their leader even a sitting prime minister. That Corbyn was elected Labour leader was the fault of the far left and the unions. He had never been a cabinet minister in any Labour government, he was backbencher who frequently rebelled on party votes and now he demands loyalty as leader. And he's dragged his feet at cleaning up the anti-Semitism scandal which is disgraceful, at least one Labour MP who left the party recently said it was because of anti-Semitism she's a Jewish MP from Liverpoole. Keir Starmer as Labour leader could win a national election, Corbyn should be dumped.

Businesses are really worried especially those in finance, some are already stockpiling goods because of backups at shipping ports but some things are too perishable. Hope everything works out for your friends, there are plenty of expat Brits in Spain and France who are worried too. Many have gotten two passports, one UK and one EU just in case.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#60 Post by YankeeTarheel » Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:40 am

Corbyn dragged his feet because he IS an anti-Semite, equating Jewishness, Zionism, and the fascist actions of the current corrupt Likud government. The fact that a Russian Mafia thug like Avigdor Lieberman can lead a party and even hold a major ministry portfolio, is evidence that THIS Israeli government needs to be replaced and that can only be done by the labor/Dem/Socialist parties winning back the Knesset.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#61 Post by K9s » Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:40 pm

When I feel bad about our 2016 election, I feel worse about their Brexit vote. We were all conned.

Remember that, around the same time, someone was trying to get California to exit the US and actually thought it might work. It failed, so he fled to Russia. I think foreign actors had a lot more to do with Brexit than we know.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#62 Post by highdesert » Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:50 pm

Another bad day for Theresa May in voting by MPs in the House of Commons.
MPs have voted to reject leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreement. Theresa May said there was a "clear majority" against a no-deal Brexit but the "legal default" was that the UK would leave without a deal on 29 March if no deal is reached. MPs will now get a vote on delaying Brexit, said the prime minister. That vote will take place on Thursday, and if it is passed - and the EU agrees to it - the UK will not leave the EU as planned on 29 March.

The government tabled a motion to prevent the UK from exiting the EU on 29 March without a withdrawal agreement. But before MPs voted on that, they backed an amendment rejecting a no-deal Brexit under any circumstances - by just four votes. This dramatic development led to the government ordering Conservative MPs to vote against its own motion. But the government motion, as amended, was passed by 321 votes to 278, reinforcing the message that MPs do not want to leave without a deal.

MPs also voted by 374 to 164 to reject a plan to delay the UK's departure from the EU until 22 May, 2019 so that there can be what its supporters call a "managed no-deal" Brexit. This amendment was proposed by Prime Minister Theresa May's former second-in-command, Conservative MP Damian Green, and was backed by prominent Conservative Brexiteers and Remainers. It was known as the Malthouse Compromise - after Kit Malthouse, the government minister who devised it.
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47562995

And once again, MPs rejected the withdrawal agreement negotiated by Theresa May with the EU and signed in November 2018.
European politician after European politician tweeted to say how disappointed they were, how businesses and citizens across the EU and UK now faced more agonising uncertainty and that the vote in the House of Commons brought everyone much closer to a no-deal Brexit.

The EU's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier best summed up the European mood when he insisted the EU had done everything it could and that the deadlock could only be solved in the UK. There would be no more negotiations.
The EU finger of blame points directly at the UK and the fact that parliament did not decide, or rather was never consulted about, what kind of Brexit it wanted before negotiations began - even when everyone knew MPs would have the final say on any resulting deal.
Theresa May never consulted MPs before triggering Brexit and before she signed the agreement in November 2018.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-47549607
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#63 Post by YankeeTarheel » Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:13 pm

K9s wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:40 pm
When I feel bad about our 2016 election, I feel worse about their Brexit vote. We were all conned.

Remember that, around the same time, someone was trying to get California to exit the US and actually thought it might work. It failed, so he fled to Russia. I think foreign actors had a lot more to do with Brexit than we know.
Look for a guy named "Banks"--forgot his first name....Yeah, Brexit was yet another Russian cyber warfare attack.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#64 Post by TrueTexan » Wed Mar 13, 2019 6:17 pm

YankeeTarheel wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:13 pm
K9s wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:40 pm
When I feel bad about our 2016 election, I feel worse about their Brexit vote. We were all conned.

Remember that, around the same time, someone was trying to get California to exit the US and actually thought it might work. It failed, so he fled to Russia. I think foreign actors had a lot more to do with Brexit than we know.
Look for a guy named "Banks"--forgot his first name....Yeah, Brexit was yet another Russian cyber warfare attack.
Putin to the U.K. and E.U.

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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#65 Post by TrueTexan » Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:02 am

How a no Brexit deal would screw the UK economy.
A meaningful vote on whether to rule out a no-deal Brexit could take place as late as March 12, less than three weeks before the UK is due to leave the EU, with or without a deal – and the clock is ticking down. Parliament needs to avoid a hard Brexit to protect industry and to make sure that Brexit doesn’t disproportionately hurt weaker regions of the UK.

That’s a key finding from our latest research, just published in the journal Contemporary Social Science, which outlines how reliant the UK economy is on inward investment and how a no-deal Brexit will see that investment (and the jobs that come with it) dry up. But, whatever happens with Brexit, the UK must develop a more regional industrial strategy to bring better jobs and productivity to the country as a whole.

The UK economy relies more on foreign investment than any other G7 country. Investment into the UK has driven demand for skilled jobs such as technicians, engineers and IT specialists. UK businesses that were foreign-owned and received investment from overseas employed four million people in 2016 – some 17% of all UK employees. Half of those were employed by EU-owned firms.

A key point to note is that leaving the single market could put these good-quality jobs at risk, forcing more UK workers into “bad jobs” including zero-hours contracts, which require few skills and little room for progression.

Above all, the government needs to avoid a hard Brexit that involves the return of tariff barriers. Ideally, it should secure a trade deal as soon as possible, which prioritises access to the single market for as many sectors.

Leaving the single market would make it more difficult for European businesses to invest in the UK economy, putting almost 20% of current jobs at risk – including many of the UK’s relatively “good jobs” that require training, are higher paid and have permanent contracts. There is also a danger that the UK’s weaker regions will be disproportionately hurt by Brexit, a point which tallies with other research into the regional impact of Brexit.

It’s doubtful that the £1.6 billion Stronger Towns Fund, just announced by the government, would go anywhere near compensating for this.
https://www.alternet.org/2019/03/a-no-d ... s-at-risk/

It could also start another worldwide resession.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#66 Post by sikacz » Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:12 am

Voting has consequences. The people voted once and some people were disappointed. Vote again and regardless some people will be upset. Perhaps adhearing to a vote should stand, a new vote also sends the message that people votes don’t matter unless the right side wins. There is a bunch of doom and gloom over business and the economy. Perhaps the unknown needs to be tested, that is what the previous winning side wanted. The world will recover after Brexit, probably faster than people think.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#67 Post by highdesert » Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:23 am

Today there is a vote in the Commons on legislation that would officially delay UK exit from the EU beyond March 29th. And Theresa May announced that next week she will make a third attempt to get her EU agreement passed, MPs don't want it but she's playing a brinkmanship game - my agreement or chaos. EU Council President Donald Tusk is proposing a long extension of Brexit to allow the UK parliament an opportunity to debate all options and perhaps hold a new referendum on exiting the EU or a referendum on a proposed agreement or even a general election.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#68 Post by featureless » Thu Mar 14, 2019 11:42 am

sikacz wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:12 am
Voting has consequences. The people voted once and some people were disappointed. Vote again and regardless some people will be upset. Perhaps adhearing to a vote should stand, a new vote also sends the message that people votes don’t matter unless the right side wins.
So much this.

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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#69 Post by K9s » Thu Mar 14, 2019 12:08 pm

At least they are reflective about the vote. They are showing other countries how bad it can be. We still have 45 talking about how bad and unfair the EU is today (how embarrassing!), but the truth is slowly seeping into common knowledge.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#70 Post by K9s » Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:45 pm

Parliament votes to delay Brexit beyond this month

Lawmakers came out in support of asking the European Union for an extension of at least several weeks. Prime Minister Theresa May wants Parliament to vote again on her withdrawal deal next week. If it passes, she would seek a “one-off extension” ending on June 30. If it’s rejected for a third time, she would ask for a longer extension. The other 27 leaders of E.U. countries would have to agree.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/eu ... story.html
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#71 Post by featureless » Thu Mar 14, 2019 3:13 pm

K9s wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:45 pm
Parliament votes to delay Brexit beyond this month

Lawmakers came out in support of asking the European Union for an extension of at least several weeks. Prime Minister Theresa May wants Parliament to vote again on her withdrawal deal next week. If it passes, she would seek a “one-off extension” ending on June 30. If it’s rejected for a third time, she would ask for a longer extension. The other 27 leaders of E.U. countries would have to agree.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/eu ... story.html
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#72 Post by highdesert » Thu Mar 21, 2019 10:22 pm

European Union leaders on Thursday agreed to extend the deadline for Britain’s looming exit from the bloc in order to give Prime Minister Theresa May and the British Parliament more time to get their act together. Thursday’s agreement effectively averted the possibility of a disorderly and possibly chaotic departure by Britain on March 29. Yet that still remains a possibility just a few weeks later.

After hours of difficult and sometimes passionate talks, the leaders decided that Britain’s exit date will be pushed back to May 22 if next week Mrs. May can persuade lawmakers in Parliament to accept her plan for leaving the bloc, which they have already rejected overwhelmingly, not once but twice. If she cannot persuade lawmakers to accept her plan, Mrs. May will get a shorter delay in exiting the European Union — until April 12. But Britain could stay in the bloc longer if it decides it needs more time for a more fundamental rethink of Brexit, as the process is known.

For a longer extension, though, it would have to take part in elections to the European Parliament in May — something Mrs. May said early Friday would be an absurdity, three years after Britons voted in a referendum to leave the bloc. Speaking at a news conference after the extended deadlines were announced, Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, said that until April 12, “all options will remain open and the cliff-edge date will be delayed.”

But he added that if there was no agreement in Parliament, and Britain had not indicated by April 12 that it was willing to take part in the European elections, “the option of a long extension will automatically become impossible.” The European leaders wanted to make sure that next week does not result in a crashing out of Britain, which neither side wants, and they wanted to settle the extension issue now, without having to come back again for another urgent meeting so close to March 29. The leaders also made it clear that it is for Britain to make serious choices, and soon, and that failure should not be laid at the door of Brussels.

Thursday’s decision on extending the deadline was made by the leaders of 27 nations of the European Union, without Mrs. May. But she was consulted throughout, Mr. Tusk said, and agreed to the decision.
On Wednesday, she had made a formal request for an extension until June 30, but when asked by other leaders on Thursday how she intended to proceed if she failed to get her deal through Parliament next week, she had no answer, European diplomats said. Asked at the news conference about the atmosphere during discussions with Mrs. May, Mr. Tusk, who has often spoken of his wish that Britain remain in the European Union, diplomatically replied that it was “much better than I expected” and said he was pleased that the long discussions had found “a way to ease the process for both sides.’’

Frustration with Britain’s political dysfunction has been palpable in Brussels, which has seen its agenda hijacked by the constant twists and turns of a divided British government that seems incapable of deciding what it wants. The other European leaders believe that Mrs. May has lost much of her authority, and they have largely lost faith in her ability to deliver on Brexit. The option of a longer extension is meant to give Parliament time to take control of the process, if it can, or even for the British to have a general election to break the current political impasse. Mrs. May’s plan would eventually give Britain power over immigration from Europe, but tie the country to the European Union’s customs and trade system until at least the end of 2020.

Speaking after the meeting, Mrs. May insisted that Britain would leave the European Union, but gave no clarity on what would happen if her deal is rejected next week. “At this point we would either leave with no deal, or put forward an alternative plan,” she said, adding that this would mean participating in European elections, something she described as “wrong.” But it is possible that Parliament could vote to keep closer ties to the bloc — a so-called soft Brexit — and Mrs. May did not completely exclude that option, by saying she would work with lawmakers if they reject her deal.

Mrs. May refused to exclude the possibility of leaving the bloc without a deal. But the growing sense of alarm over a “no deal” Brexit is real. And even if the deadline has been pushed back from March 29, it has not been pushed back very far. ”Our country is facing a national emergency,” the main British business and trade union groupings, the Confederation of British Industry and the Trades Union Congress, said in a rare joint statement. “Decisions of recent days have caused the risk of no deal to soar,” the statement said. “Firms and communities across the U.K. are not ready for this outcome. The shock to our economy would be felt by generations to come.”

In Brussels on Thursday, European officials also were host to talks with Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, which wants closer ties to the European Union than do Mrs. May’s Conservatives and could play a critical role in the way things unfold in London. If Mrs. May, against the odds, does succeed in Parliament next week, then matters move relatively smoothly, with a modest delay to Brexit to allow for enacting legislation to put her plan in place. But the prime minister’s angry denunciation of lawmakers in a national address Wednesday evening is unlikely to make it any easier to win over opposition legislators.

The Europeans do not want to be seen as responsible for the disaster of a no-deal exit. Not only would this hurt their economies, but it could leave a bitter legacy with a big and important neighbor while complicating the bloc’s finances. Britain has the power to withdraw its decision to leave the bloc — as opposed to requesting an extension of negotiations — and could do that unilaterally. Yet it is almost impossible to imagine Mrs. May doing this, since she has vowed to deliver Brexit one way or another. There will be continued pressure on Mrs. May, whose position is considered weak. She could face a leadership crisis, particularly if she tries to pursue a no-deal Brexit. But it would be hard to force her out, even if more pro-European cabinet ministers threaten to quit. And resigning would be out of character for a leader who by nature and character has been willing to endure scorn, humiliation and divisions as she pursues what she considers to be Britain’s best version of Brexit.

Dalia Grybauskaite, the outspoken president of Lithuania, favors patience with Britain. “We will be supportive to the prime minister, in any way we can,” she said. “We need to be prepared for everything, but of course we will do everything to find a solution,” Ms. Grybauskaite said.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/worl ... u-uk.html

Last week, John Bercow, the Speaker of the House of Commons threw a wrench into Theresa May's strategy. He ruled based on precedents back to 1604, that May cannot resubmit her Brexit agreement as written for a third vote. It's been rejected by the House twice and he ruled that unless it was substantially changed it couldn't be voted on a third time.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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K9s
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#73 Post by K9s » Thu Mar 21, 2019 10:25 pm

Britain will not leave the European Union next week, after E.U. leaders permit short reprieve

The E.U. offer averted an abrupt, economy-shaking withdrawal on March 29. But Prime Minister Theresa May must get Parliament to pass her withdrawal plan or risk crashing out in April.
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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#74 Post by highdesert » Fri Mar 22, 2019 11:35 am

K9s wrote:
Thu Mar 21, 2019 10:25 pm
Britain will not leave the European Union next week, after E.U. leaders permit short reprieve

The E.U. offer averted an abrupt, economy-shaking withdrawal on March 29. But Prime Minister Theresa May must get Parliament to pass her withdrawal plan or risk crashing out in April.
The president of the EU Donald Tusk had originally suggested there be a 12 month extension for a full internal debate within the UK. May wanted to avoid EU parliament elections in May 2019, but it's looking more and more like the debate and further negotiations go past even June 30, 2019. And Jeremy Corbyn talking to the EU about a Norway Brexit doesn't even have the Labour Party behind him. It's still a mess.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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Re: Meanwhile across the pond and the chaos with Brexit

#75 Post by sikacz » Fri Mar 22, 2019 12:23 pm

highdesert wrote:
Fri Mar 22, 2019 11:35 am
K9s wrote:
Thu Mar 21, 2019 10:25 pm
Britain will not leave the European Union next week, after E.U. leaders permit short reprieve

The E.U. offer averted an abrupt, economy-shaking withdrawal on March 29. But Prime Minister Theresa May must get Parliament to pass her withdrawal plan or risk crashing out in April.
The president of the EU Donald Tusk had originally suggested there be a 12 month extension for a full internal debate within the UK. May wanted to avoid EU parliament elections in May 2019, but it's looking more and more like the debate and further negotiations go past even June 30, 2019. And Jeremy Corbyn talking to the EU about a Norway Brexit doesn't even have the Labour Party behind him. It's still a mess.
EU will fall like dominos as each country realizes that their internal interests are overruled by an unelected commission. The EU should have stayed as an economic trade union, the European common market.
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