Voting in the 2020 general election

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damnitman
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by damnitman »

Florida's right-wing governor has decided to return to a 2016 system to make sure our votes are properly tabulated. As an added security process this year, when you show up at your usual voting space, you will be assigned to a random precinct, somewhere in the 830 mile long state.
This is our new voting machine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmPtfy9P714

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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by TrueTexan »

damnitman wrote:
Sun Sep 27, 2020 2:24 pm
Florida's right-wing governor has decided to return to a 2016 system to make sure our votes are properly tabulated. As an added security process this year, when you show up at your usual voting space, you will be assigned to a random precinct, somewhere in the 830 mile long state.
This is our new voting machine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmPtfy9P714
Is this the same system used in 2000?

If so we should say instead of hanging Chad how about Hanging DeSantis.
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by TrueTexan »

Florida could have a simple system each voter must bring in one live adult Burmese Python from the Everglades to be qualified to vote.
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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Wino wrote:
Sat Sep 26, 2020 10:48 am
Read this morning three judge appeals court in Texas has reinstated a straight ticket box to tick on in person ballot machines. Mail in ballots already printed and will not have the option, but at home you have all the time you want. This will speed up in person voting, no doubt. I expect AG Ken Paxton to appeal the decision, so it still may not fly.

When I was completing a sample ballot at home I printed off county site, I thought, damn this is a long ballot and that I was glad I wasn't going to be standing in line early or election day, cause with no straight ticket box it's gonna take forever for each voter.

I have been inundated with rebup mailers from Turd to every cockroach repub running, but have not received ONE from any Democrats - weird !!
Straight ticket put on hold by federal court. Anything to help turd is always first and foremost with AG Paxton.

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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by TrueTexan »

I used the party line voting for years. It speeds up the time in the polls. This ploy by the Reptilians is just to jam up the voting lines by making people take more time to color in the little squares or select each candidate on the little computer screen. More likely to cause an error that could disqualify the ballot.Also many voters will give up and not vote if the wait is too long.
Anything to prevent voters from voting.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by highdesert »

For the first time in California history, a ballot will make its way in the mail this week to every registered California voter, a decision made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that will reshape the election experience as well as the strategies of campaigns and candidates.More than 21 million ballots will be mailed, more than in any state in the nation. Most will arrive this week, though some counties began the process almost two weeks ago. State law requires absentee ballots to be mailed no later than Monday, 29 days before the Nov. 3 election.

Few states have moved more decisively toward voting by mail over the last two decades than California, and the results have been striking. At least two-thirds of the ballots cast in the three most recent statewide elections had been mailed to voters, peaking at 72% of all votes recorded in the March primary.

Even so, millions of voters have bucked the trend and continued to vote in person on election day, and millions more don’t often participate or are newly registered. Should those two groups decide to use the ballot that arrives in the mail, they will have to abide by voting rules that might not be easily understood.
Researchers have estimated that the average California election in the last decade saw an average of 1.7% of vote-by-mail ballots
rejected for a variety of reasons. Based on voter turnout in the 2016 presidential election — which some think will be surpassed this year — the historical average would translate into almost 250,000 ballots not being counted.

Last month, Alexander’s organization released a detailed review of rejected absentee ballots in three counties from the November 2018 election. The top three reasons were that voters returned them too late, they didn’t sign the ballot envelope or the signature provided didn’t match the one on file. “We have this persistent, stubborn ballot rejection problem,” she said. “It’s heartbreaking when people’s ballots are rejected.”
In 1979, the state eliminated the need for an excuse to receive an absentee ballot, a system still used in some parts of the country. The option to choose permanent absentee voting was created in 2002. The changes have proved popular; in all but two statewide elections since 2008, the majority of votes were not cast at a traditional polling place.

Some communities have gone much further. Four rural counties had no in-person voting locations in March. Fourteen more counties — including Orange, Sacramento and Santa Clara — have adopted the state Voter’s Choice Act, an optional state law that requires them to mail every voter a ballot while replacing traditional neighborhood polling places with multipurpose vote centers. Those in-person locations offer multiple election services for up to 10 days before election day.
The county has leased two large facilities at the Fairplex [LA County fairgrounds] in Pomona to handle the initial intake of ballots this fall, a venue large enough to accommodate a large volume of ballots and for workers to maintain physical distancing. Once sorted, the ballots will be counted at an election operations center in Downey.

Other counties are also adding additional capacity. And elections officials across California are stockpiling personal protective equipment — both for their workers and for voters who show at in-person locations.
A state law approved in 2015 allows a voter eight days to sign the ballot envelope if that step is forgotten. In 2018, the law was expanded to allow extra time to resolve signatures that don’t appear to match. Lawmakers that year also approved sending voters a return ballot envelope with the postage prepaid.

For this election, California has put in place a statewide tracking system, in which voters can register to receive updates on their ballot’s delivery and when it’s counted.
One recent law remains controversial: a 2016 state statute allowing a voter to hand the sealed absentee ballot to anyone for delivery to elections officials, even if it’s collected with other ballots by a political campaign or advocacy group. Other states have also removed rules allowing only family members to deliver a voter’s completed ballot, but California law is the most generous — placing no limit on how many completed ballots one person can legally transport. Republicans, in particular, have decried the practice, though GOP operatives admit their best response is to use the system better than rival Democrats.
Perhaps most striking for the Nov. 3 election was the decision to, just this once, more than quintuple the number of days a ballot has to arrive at an election office. As long as the absentee envelope is postmarked by election day, a ballot can arrive by the close of business on Nov. 20 — a 17-day grace period that surpasses the extended time being offered by any other state.

Understandably, elections watchers expect the final results this time to come in even later than the long counts that California has become known for in past elections.
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... l-election

In my county in the metro areas early voting will be held at a sports arena and in a terminal of one of the international airports. They have plenty of parking and people can physically distance. If it wasn't for the pandemic I'd volunteer to work the polls.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has extended the state's deadline for Floridians to register to vote after the state's registration website crashed due to a heavy volume of traffic. The new deadline to register is 7 p.m. Tuesday.

In a statement, Florida Secretary of State Laurel Lee said the state's online registration portal experienced "unprecedented volume and traffic" of 1.1 million requests an hour Monday evening.

"We are working with local Supervisors of Elections and the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to ensure that all eligible registrants have the ability submit a voter registration application by 7:00 p.m. this evening," Lee said in a statement.

"We will work with our state and federal law enforcement partners to ensure this was not a deliberate act against the voting process," she added.

The crash, which sparked outrage from Democrats, could have prevented thousands of potential voters from being able to participate in the Nov. 3 general election.

The outage comes as the state is once again highly competitive in this fall's presidential race. Former Vice President Joe Biden campaigned Monday in Miami.

On Tuesday, a coalition of voting rights groups filed a lawsuit against DeSantis and Lee to extend the registration deadline further by at least two days, arguing that the one-day extension isn't sufficient to educate voters that they're able to try to register again.

"Florida's OVR system has a history of malfunctioning and crashing in advance of major deadlines like the last day of registration before a major election," said Stephanie Porta, executive director of Organize Florida.

"In the midst of a global health pandemic, Floridians should not be denied the right to vote because the Secretary of State can't properly update and maintain a website."
https://www.npr.org/2020/10/06/92077470 ... te-crashes

In FL election offices are allowed to count absentee ballots when they are returned, in many states like CA they can't be counted until after the polls close on election day.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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I voted today. Straight democratic except for local elections like sheriff, county supervisor, and state legislature. I live in trump country and republicans usually run unopposed in local races. I did write in for state senator which caused me to make a mistake and I had to request a new ballot.

The county supervisor I voted for is a republican but I know him personally.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by sig230 »

An insert with my Texas Mail in Ballot says the rule for turning them in to the registrar is on Election Day only, not by election day and you must have an approved id and turn them in in person.

Why not make things even more difficult.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by highdesert »

harriss wrote:
Thu Oct 08, 2020 3:23 pm
I voted today. Straight democratic except for local elections like sheriff, county supervisor, and state legislature. I live in trump country and republicans usually run unopposed in local races. I did write in for state senator which caused me to make a mistake and I had to request a new ballot.

The county supervisor I voted for is a republican but I know him personally.
You're definitely in Trump county, redder than Maricopa and Pima counties.

I'm still working on my sample ballot, too many state propositions. A member of the state legislature for my district who was a Schwarzenagger Republican is now an Independent. In our jungle primary a right wing Republican is his opponent, the incumbent is very popular I don't have a problem voting for him.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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Early voting turnout continues to shatter records, as sky-high voter enthusiasm meets the realities of the United States' creaky machinery of democracy amid a pandemic. That means long lines in some places and administrative errors with some mail ballots, but a system that is working overall, according to experts. "Despite some of those concerns, things are going at this point reasonably well," said former Deputy Postmaster General Ronald Stroman, speaking specifically about the expansion of voting by mail.

More than 26 million people had voted as of Saturday, according to the U.S. Elections Project, a turnout-tracking database run by University of Florida political scientist Michael McDonald. That's more than six times the number of votes cast by the same point in 2016. While there are still more than two weeks to go before Election Day, here are some takeaways from the votes that have already been cast.

1. Democrats are coming in force

Polling data have indicated for months that Democrats have intended to vote earlier at much higher rates than Republicans, who were reacting to President Trump's near-constant false claims that voting by mail would lead to widespread fraud. We're now getting evidence from actual voting behavior that confirms those polls.

Democrats have cast about 53% of the early votes, according to predictive analysis by the data firm TargetSmart, which uses voter data beyond party registration to project turnout trends. That's compared with 36% by Republicans.

The early voters also tend to trend older. Voters 50 or older make up more than 70% of the votes cast, according to the TargetSmart analysis. Hundreds of thousands more young people have voted at this point in October, compared with the 2016 election, but they still make up a lower share of the overall total than they did then.

Notably, African American voters make up a larger share of early voters than in 2016. More than six times as many African American voters have voted early this year than had at the same point in the last presidential election, according to TargetSmart.

2. Confidence is down

Trump's rhetoric has also affected how confident people feel about the electoral process as Election Day approaches. Overall, the share of registered voters who say elections in the U.S. will be administered well this year has dropped significantly over the past two years, from 81% in October 2018 to 62% this year, according to a new Pew Research poll. That decline is driven by Trump supporters, half of whom now say they don't think elections will be administered well. More than half also say they think absentee ballots won't be counted correctly.

Those trends worry voting experts, who say confidence in the nuts and bolts of an election's mechanics is key so that results are accepted as legitimate. "If significant portions of the public do not have faith that the outcomes of our elections are legitimate, then you quite literally have a divided country," said Eddie Perez, an elections expert at the OSET Institute. "I don't mean that rhetorically. You literally have a divided country where the question of having a peaceful transfer of power really is a concern."

3. Long lines, tech problems in some precincts

As early voting began in states like Georgia and Texas last week, long lines quickly formed at some polling places, with some voters waiting in line for many hours before casting a ballot. Computer issues played a big role in those delays, according to officials. In Georgia, Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger said the registration database used to check people in for early voting was bogged down by the high amount of traffic.

"If you look at the amount of information that's just flowing, it's like everyone jumping on I-285 in the morning, and sometimes you have to stagger out the rush hour," he said, according to Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler. "Our vendors have been working on that along with our staff to make sure we're looking at some other optimizations and we should have that probably done by the end of this week."

In Fort Bend County, Texas, a check-in machine glitch shut down at least four precincts there. "I, quite frankly, think it's a form of voter suppression," a voter named Renee told Houston Public Media's Elizabeth Trovall, after waiting in line to vote for nearly four hours. "There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way ... I've just never seen anything like this ever."

Election officials and experts have warned all summer that some in-person voting locations would probably be plagued by longer lines this fall, as jurisdictions have had to consolidate polling places and recruit more poll workers. Another factor: Social distancing efforts may make even relatively short lines seem much longer. But lines have been the exception across the country overall, not the rule. And there's also optimism that precincts that have struggled with lines will start to see them ease as early voting continues.

Gwinnett County, Ga., for instance, was reporting lengthy waits earlier this week at a number of precincts, but by Friday afternoon, the county's online wait tracker showed no wait longer than 90 minutes. "Many people are passionate about participating in this election," said Perez. "And so it's appropriate that there's a lot of bottled up demand for people to get there right away and get their vote in. The volumes you're seeing on the very first day of early voting will probably taper off some later in the period."

4. More mail, more problems

States have rapidly scaled up their vote-by-mail efforts to serve the 40% of voters who now say they plan to vote that way. But with an increase in usage also comes a corresponding increase in administrative errors. Reports are cropping up seemingly daily of another batch of ballots that went out to voters with some sort of mistake.

Last week, Allegheny County in Pennsylvania announced that the company in charge of printing and mailing ballots mistakenly sent nearly 29,000 voters the wrong ballots. Last month, similar clerical issues affected the mail ballots of thousands of voters in Ohio and New York. "With a little under three weeks to go, it's imperative that we ensure that our elections system is one that voters can trust," said Allegheny County elections manager Dave Voye on Wednesday, as WESA's Lucy Perkins reported. "This was a failure on behalf of our contractor and impacts too many of our voters."

The county added a search function on its website so voters can check whether they were one of those affected, and it will also send all the voters new ballots. Stroman, the former deputy postmaster general who is now a senior fellow at the Democracy Fund, said it's important to remember that in all these instances, officials caught their errors with enough time to fix them. Officials also have safeguards in place to make sure no one votes twice. "I think to this point, what we're seeing are pretty much the normal mistakes, exacerbated by a global pandemic," Stroman said.

Trump has sought to use these sorts of problems as evidence that the entire system of voting by mail is flawed or fraudulent in some way. But these sorts of issues happen every election, says Kathleen Hale, an election administration expert at Auburn University, and they aren't the sign of anything nefarious or broken. "A significant portion of the process is conducted by human beings," Hale said. "And they're not perfect."
https://www.npr.org/2020/10/18/92418208 ... ive-errors
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by sig230 »

So far in Hidalgo County in the first seven days of Early Voting the numbers are up considerably over 2016. In fact so far the Early Votes are 75% of what the total early voting from 2016 numbered and there are still eleven days to go.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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In CA every voter got a mail ballot and the return as of October 13th wasn't that high. Other than the county elections office, most counties aren't doing in person early voting until next week.
https://files.constantcontact.com/c1d64 ... eef2d6.pdf
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by YankeeTarheel »

sig230 wrote:
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:48 pm
An insert with my Texas Mail in Ballot says the rule for turning them in to the registrar is on Election Day only, not by election day and you must have an approved id and turn them in in person.

Why not make things even more difficult.
Do you have to have an authorized, notarized tattoo on your forehead as well, personally signed by the Governor?
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by highdesert »

YankeeTarheel wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 12:18 pm
sig230 wrote:
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:48 pm
An insert with my Texas Mail in Ballot says the rule for turning them in to the registrar is on Election Day only, not by election day and you must have an approved id and turn them in in person.

Why not make things even more difficult.
Do you have to have an authorized, notarized tattoo on your forehead as well, personally signed by the Governor?
Wish we could get voting laws standardized nationwide, probably will only happen after we blow up the two party system. They want a binary world - good versus evil.

A morbid topic but an interesting article:
If you die before election day, does your early ballot count? That depends

At 90 years old and living through a raging pandemic, Hannah Carson knows time may be short. She wasted no time returning her absentee ballot for this year’s election.

As soon as it arrived at her senior-living community, she filled it out and sent it back to her local election office in Charlotte, N.C. If something were to happen and she doesn’t make it to election day, Carson said she hopes her ballot will remain valid.

“I should think I should count, given all the years I have been here,” she said.

But it might not. In North Carolina, an early ballot cast by someone who subsequently dies can be set aside if a challenge is filed with the county board of elections before election day.
Seventeen states prohibit counting ballots cast by someone who subsequently dies before election day, but 10 states specifically allow it. The law is silent in the rest of the country, according to research by the National Conference of State Legislatures.
In California, it’s an issue of fairness to count ballots cast by people who then die before election day, Secretary of State Alex Padilla said. He said it’s just as conceivable that someone who votes early in person also dies before election day, and there is no way to identify and reject that ballot. “The dead voters [issue] is used as a false narrative, a pretext for changes in some states to how they register voters or count ballots when the data shows otherwise,” Padilla said.
When someone dies close to an election, it takes time for death records to be updated, and there is a narrow window between when a ballot is cast and counted. Colorado in 2016 had between 15 and 20 instances of voters who cast a ballot by mail and then died before election day. All were counted.

In Michigan’s primary earlier this year, 864 ballots were rejected because the voters died before the election even though they were alive when they filled them out.
Wisconsin, which like North Carolina is a presidential battleground this year, is among the states that prohibit a ballot from being counted if the voter dies after submitting it. Every month, the state’s election commission receives records of county death certificates, and those records are run against the statewide voter registration system.

Any potential matches are flagged to the local clerk where the voter is registered, and the clerk is responsible for verifying the match by looking at obituaries and other sources before changing the voter’s status, said Reid Magney, Wisconsin Election Commission spokesman. Iowa’s election office receives death records and processes them as they are received, including on election day. If a person dies after requesting or returning an absentee ballot, the ballot is voided and not counted, said Kevin Hall, spokesman for Iowa’s secretary of state.

“Voters have to be eligible electors on election day,” Hall said. “Even though Iowa had 29 days of absentee voting, there is still only one election day.”
https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/st ... ection-day
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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34 million have voted so far, but the number of votes cast in 2016 was about 137 million and one expert predicted we could hit 150 million votes in 2020.
First, it’s not like no one voted early in 2016. That was a record year for early voting, with about 40% of all votes cast early. We’re at 20% of the 2016 total vote as I write this [10/18]. The ratio of 2020 early vote to 2016 early vote is going to come down simply because it is impossible that early voting is going to be six times what it was in 2016.
Trump is putting his eggs into the Election Day basket, and that is risky. It is not unheard of for bad weather to happen on Election Day – a snowstorm, rain, or even a tropical disturbance. Bad weather is known to depress turnout. There will be fewer polling locations because of COVID, so Election Day lines could be unusually long and miserable to stand in with bad weather. A COVID issue could unexpectedly shutter an election office or polling location, creating last minute chaos.

Again, maybe Republicans start voting in-person over the next two weeks. If I were running a campaign, I’d much prefer to be the one where I’ve already banked millions of votes more than my opponent.
https://electproject.github.io/Early-Vo ... index.html
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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Everything I need to know about voting in the 2020 general election I learned from Natalie on Contrapoints.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ContraPoints
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by TrueTexan »

I agree with Highdesert with the idea of standard voting laws nationwide. I would like to see, at least in Federal office elections, that all US citizens above the age of 18 have the right and can vote in federal elections. I do mean all. I could go with a couple of exceptions. Convicted of Treason and/or taking away or suppressing another citizen's right to vote.

Have mail in ballots to all citizens eligible to vote. Early voting standardize across the nation. Having ballots standaized to vote by party and or candidate nationwide.

Next I would like to see a standardized ballot system. Here is what I have to do to vote. I go to the election poll. Present my Texas Driver License. The poll worker scans it in to a scanner and the prints out a ballot. Hands me my DL, Ballot and marker. I go to a booth and select the candidates I am voting for by coloring in a little square box by their name. when finished I go to another machine where I place the ballot in the machine to be scanned. It scans th ballot and if it doesn't find any errors tabulates the votes and stores the ballot. It then flashes a Thank you for voting on a screen and I leave.

This has been the easiest and most secure voting system I have seen. It is basically a Scantron type system. Nice thing it has a secure paper ballot and a quick tabulation.

This seems to be the best system I have used in the 49 years I have cast a ballot. At least it is hard to flip a vote unlike some of the Diebold machines that Tarrant county (Fort Worth) was using.

We should make voting inclusive not exclusive.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by rolandson »

Daughter lives in Florida, and is temporarily elsewhere for work. She submitted her request for an absentee ballot in July, and confirmed it in August. She was told the ballot would be mailed in early September.

First week in October she called her election registrar to confirm her ballot had been mailed and the address it was mailed to. Everything was correct. Except, no ballot. Last week she called again. This time the registrar told her that the ballot had been mailed in early September to her Florida address.

They tell her that to have a new ballot sent to the address they confirmed two weeks earlier, she would need to submit an affidavit to the registrar and it would take two weeks to process before a new ballot could be mailed.

In short, she doesn't get to vote.

Worse, the registrar's office weenie laughed when my daughter, a registered democrat, commented that this effectively prevented her from voting.

Best is...she recorded the conversation. A copy of which was emailed to the federal elections commission and the DNC.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

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TrueTexan wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 5:11 pm
I agree with Highdesert with the idea of standard voting laws nationwide. I would like to see, at least in Federal office elections, that all US citizens above the age of 18 have the right and can vote in federal elections. I do mean all. I could go with a couple of exceptions. Convicted of Treason and/or taking away or suppressing another citizen's right to vote.

Have mail in ballots to all citizens eligible to vote. Early voting standardize across the nation. Having ballots standaized to vote by party and or candidate nationwide.

Next I would like to see a standardized ballot system. Here is what I have to do to vote. I go to the election poll. Present my Texas Driver License. The poll worker scans it in to a scanner and the prints out a ballot. Hands me my DL, Ballot and marker. I go to a booth and select the candidates I am voting for by coloring in a little square box by their name. when finished I go to another machine where I place the ballot in the machine to be scanned. It scans th ballot and if it doesn't find any errors tabulates the votes and stores the ballot. It then flashes a Thank you for voting on a screen and I leave.

This has been the easiest and most secure voting system I have seen. It is basically a Scantron type system. Nice thing it has a secure paper ballot and a quick tabulation.

This seems to be the best system I have used in the 49 years I have cast a ballot. At least it is hard to flip a vote unlike some of the Diebold machines that Tarrant county (Fort Worth) was using.

We should make voting inclusive not exclusive.
I haven't been to a local polling site/precinct in my county in so long that I can't remember how it worked. If I vote at the county registrar of voters office it's similar to your process. I'm asked to fill out a form with name, address and signature, CA doesn't require DL or ID but I usually hand it to them. They verify I'm registered to vote and print up a ballot it's usually multiple pages/both sides (card stock) and they hand me the ballot and an envelope. After I vote I tear off the top of each page of the ballot, my copy of the ballot bar codes. I fold up the ballot and place it in the envelope, seal it and sign the envelope and put it in the ballot box.

ROV staff can't start counting until after 8 pm on November 3rd when our polls close. I'm sure they must use something like high speed scantrons to do the counts. They have until December 1st to certify the county results.

Your system seems easier, less work for registrar's staff.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by rolandson »

highdesert wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:41 pm
local polling site/precinct
We don't have these any longer. Haven't needed them for 20 years. We do it all on paper, through USPS or conveniently located drop boxes throughout our many counties.

However, if one has a problem...a lost/damaged/screwed up or 'made a mistake' on the ballot that was mailed to them, one may obtain a new one and cast their only vote at their county registrar's office. Because the elections people make certain that it's only one ballot submitted per voter.

And the ballots are paper. Not a machine made by some current iteration of diebold.

Imagine the entire country maintaining a paper trail, available for as any recounts and contested pissing matches as anyone is willing to pay for?
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by highdesert »

rolandson wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 11:46 pm
highdesert wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:41 pm
local polling site/precinct
We don't have these any longer. Haven't needed them for 20 years. We do it all on paper, through USPS or conveniently located drop boxes throughout our many counties.

However, if one has a problem...a lost/damaged/screwed up or 'made a mistake' on the ballot that was mailed to them, one may obtain a new one and cast their only vote at their county registrar's office. Because the elections people make certain that it's only one ballot submitted per voter.

And the ballots are paper. Not a machine made by some current iteration of diebold.

Imagine the entire country maintaining a paper trail, available for as any recounts and contested pissing matches as anyone is willing to pay for?
Oregon has a long and distinguished history of vote by mail (VBM) going back to the 1980s. Heard that CA state elections officials checked with OR for some guidance as we did full VBM this year.

Sorry your daughter had problems voting this year, hope she copied the county and state Democratic offices and some newspapers.
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by wings »

Oregon's mail-in voting system is awesome, and should be the standard.

Best thing about voting early: getting to tell the random issues people texting at odd hours that we voted days ago.

Paper ballots here, Scantron - far better than the old touchscreen system, even though that had the paper receipt for recounts and made you verify that the paper strip had recorded your vote appropriately. I've heard that the problem was that the vote was actually recorded with a bar code, so it could read "John Kerry" but still be counted as a vote for "George W. Bush" by the machines. Now the biggest problem is bleed-through with the Sharpies they hand you.

No armed mobs, but they do have an armed police officer at the county board of elections office. There was a car with a Trump sticker parked within the "No Electioneering" zone, but it was a handicapped spot.

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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by highdesert »

Despite clear state rules requiring face coverings in all indoor public spaces, unmasked people will be welcome at polls across the Golden State. The official guidance put out by Secretary of State Alex Padilla’s office is unequivocal: “Election workers must not turn a voter away for lack of face covering. The right to vote takes precedence.”
If an unmasked person does arrive at an indoor, in-person polling station, the guidance suggests election workers practice additional physical distancing but also hold their tongues. “Confrontation of any kind is not advisable,” the guidelines state. “Intense conversation and shouting increase the volume of exhalations and may increase risk.” (Yikes!)

Legal experts say the state could have the right to restrict in-person voting for public health reasons, as long as other options — like mail-in ballots — are available. But Sam Mahood, a spokesman for Padilla’s office, said officials decided months ago to create guidelines that ensure safety while allowing everyone to vote in person. “The Secretary of State’s office views voting as a foundational constitutional right for citizens,” he said in a statement.

Across the state, election officials have already put plans in place to protect citizens who choose to vote in person, but they differ from county to county. Voters who show up in Los Angeles County without a mask will be escorted to an outdoor area, where a poll worker will hand them a ballot. In Orange County, they will be put in a booth away from other voters. And poll workers in San Bernardino and Riverside counties will offer face shields to the voters around an unmasked person while they wait to cast their ballot.

Nowhere in California will a voter who refuses to wear a mask be turned away. And remember, you can always vote by mail.
https://www.latimes.com/science/newslet ... irus-today
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Re: Voting in the 2020 general election

Post by Wino »

I believe it's a $1000.00 fine here (SATX) for refusing to allow unmaskers to vote. When my daughter voted last week (2 hour wait), that everyone she saw was masked. Hope that's a good sign, cause I expect the diehard turd worshipers will go maskless.
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