Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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featureless wrote: Tue Jun 29, 2021 11:08 am
FrontSight wrote: Tue Jun 29, 2021 10:51 am Newsom has an impressive ego...Look where it got him.
It is always very clear that laws passed by the people in power are not intended to apply to those in power. Newsom is a great example of that, be it eating out during lockdown or this. I wonder if he's ever been audited by the IRS... Nah, they only audit those that can't afford a team of tax attorneys.

Newsom is rehearsed and practiced, like he just walked off of a Hollywood sound stage. Plastic LA LA Land type but he's from the Bay Area. Yes, I expect he's untouchable by the IRS and the state FTB. He's a multimillionaire thanks to Getty investments in his businesses.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis on Thursday set Sept. 14 as the date for the recall election targeting California Gov. Gavin Newsom, leaving it up to voters to decide whether to oust a sitting governor for just the second time in the state’s history.

The tight election timetable gives prospective candidates just over two weeks to decide whether to jump into an expected frenzied race to replace Newsom, though a cadre of notable Republicans launched unofficial campaigns months ago with promises of loosening the Democrats’ ironclad grip on California’s state government.

“Now that Newsom actually has to campaign, I’m wondering if he’s up to the task,” said Anne Hyde Dunsmore, campaign manager for Rescue California, one of the main recall proponents. “We haven’t had to do much because he seems to be doing something every day that helps us.”

Newsom and his supporters have dismissed the recall effort as a long-shot ploy by the Republican Party to force its unpopular conservative agenda on Californians who support the governor’s policies, including his response to the COVID-19 pandemic, protecting the environment and advocating for gun control measures. The Democratic governor has characterized recall campaign leaders as anti-immigrant supporters of former President Trump who include QAnon conspiracy theorists and fringe members of the right wing.

Juan Rodriguez, the leader of Newsom’s anti-recall campaign, said California voters have an opportunity to “reject this Republican power grab.”

“This Republican recall is a naked attempt by Trump Republicans to grab control in California — powered by the same Republicans who refused to accept the results of the presidential election and are now pushing voter suppression laws across the country,” Rodriguez said in a statement.

Still, one the greatest threats to Newsom’s political survival would be a challenge from the left. Thus far, no prominent California Democrats have publicly entertained entering the race, and most have pledged to stay out of it.

But candidates have a limited window to mull over the idea — the final day to file paperwork to run is July 16. The opportunity to lead the largest state in the union may prove too enticing to ignore, even for someone outside the realm of politics.

Kounalakis’ announcement came just after Secretary of State Shirley Weber certified the gubernatorial recall, a campaign that collected more than 1.7 million petition signatures from California voters who supported removing Newsom from office. Under the state Constitution, Kounalakis was required to schedule an election to take place 60 to 80 days after Weber’s certification.

“Although the window of time from which I could select a date was narrow, I believe we have chosen a fair and reasonable date for this election to take place,” Kounalakis said in a statement Thursday. “It has always been my intention to choose an election date that gives election officials and the public ample time to ensure a smooth election with broad participation.”

The election will play out quickly in political terms: Start to finish, it will last less than three months.

Weber’s certification was considered a foregone conclusion for months and came just days after the state Legislature voted to revise the election rules dictating how the recall campaign will unfold — a move Republicans argued was to Newsom’s political advantage.

“It is not hyperbole to say this is qualitatively the same thing that happens in corrupt sham democracies the world over,” Assemblyman Kevin Kiley (R-Rocklin), a strong supporter of the recall effort, said during the debate over the bill. “Those in power use their power to make sure they don’t lose their power.”

The change, which Newsom quickly signed into law, effectively eliminated the required 30-day review of the recall’s estimated costs by the Legislature, accelerating the timeline for the election.
Some Newsom supporters advocated for holding the election as soon as possible because recent opinion polls showed Newsom had favorable job approval ratings, a rise driven in large part by California’s emergence from the COVID-19 pandemic and an economy on the upswing.

On Thursday, the state Department of Finance released an updated estimate of the cost of the special election: $276 million, with the vast majority of that falling on county election agencies that must shoulder the cost of printing ballots, setting up voting sites and processing votes. The state already has set aside $250.2 million to fund the recall election.

Regardless of the odds, the recall election is expected to attract a considerable amount of money.

As the target of the recall, Newsom is allowed to raise and spend an unlimited amount to fend off his ouster. The governor’s anti-recall committee already has collected more than $16.7 million — and that was before the recall was officially certified. Newsom also has more than $20 million socked away for his 2022 reelection campaign, though it’s uncertain if he’ll use any of that money, or need to, to fight the recall.

The Democratic and Republican parties have also poured money into the campaign, with more expected in the coming days.

Candidates hoping to succeed Newsom are likely to spend millions. Republican businessman John Cox of Rancho Santa Fe, whom Newsom beat handily in the 2018 governor’s race, already has tapped into $7 million of his own money for the contest.

Reality television star and retired Olympic gold medalist Caitlyn Jenner has raised more than $330,000, a modest haul. But Jenner has benefited greatly from a crush of national media attention since announcing her candidacy, despite a May poll showing she has anemic support among California voters.

That poll found that leading the Republicans in the race were former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Cox, followed by former Northern California Rep. Doug Ose.

“This movement is powered by Californians from every community — Democrats, Republicans and independents,” Faulconer said. “Change is coming for California and retirement is coming for Gavin Newsom.”

Voters will decide whether Newsom is recalled and, if so, who should replace him. Newsom is barred from being listed among the candidates who can be considered if the recall passes.
https://www.latimes.com/california/stor ... -september
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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Californians who say they expect to vote in the September recall election are almost evenly divided over whether to remove Gov. Gavin Newsom from office, evidence of how pivotal voter turnout will be in deciding the governor’s political fate, according to a new UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies poll co-sponsored by the Los Angeles Times.

The findings dispel the notion that California’s solid Democratic voter majority will provide an impenetrable shield for Newsom, and reveal a vulnerability created by a recall effort that has energized Republicans and been met with indifference by many Democrats and independent voters.

The poll found that 47% of likely California voters supported recalling the Democratic governor, compared with 50% who opposed removing Newsom from office — a difference just shy of the survey’s margin of error.


Conservative talk radio host Larry Elder, who last week won a court battle to appear on the Sept. 14 recall ballot, leads in the race to replace Newsom among the dozens of candidates in the running, while support for reality television star Caitlyn Jenner remains low, the survey found. Forty percent of likely voters remain undecided on a replacement candidate, providing ample opportunity for other gubernatorial hopefuls to rise in the ranks before the Sept. 14 special election.

Even though Democratic voters far outnumber Republicans in California, the GOP’s enthusiasm over the recall promises to inflate the potency of the anti-Newsom vote in September, said Mark DiCamillo, director of the poll. Nearly 90% of Republicans expressed a high level of interest in the recall election while just 58% of Democrats and 53% of independent voters were as interested, the poll found.

“Democrats, at least in the middle of July, almost unanimously believed that Newsom will defeat the recall. I think that may be contributing to some complacency among those voters. Republicans, on the other hand, are confident that they can turn out the governor,” DiCamillo said. “I think the Newsom campaign really has to light a fire among the Democrats and say, ‘Look, the outcome is in jeopardy unless you get out there and vote.’”

Though Republicans account for only about a quarter of all registered voters in California, the poll found that they account for 33% of those most likely to cast ballots in the recall election. Democrats make up 46% of the state’s 22 million voters and “no party preference” voters 24%, but their share of the likely recall voters drops to 42% and 18% respectively, DiCamillo said.

“Gavin Newsom is in serious trouble at this time because his base of voters is not motivated to come out and support him,” said Dave Gilliard, one of the political strategists leading the effort to oust Newsom.

Gilliard said Newsom doesn’t have much time to correct that, or voter discontent over the homeless crisis and crime in California, since elections officials will begin mailing ballots to all registered voters starting Aug. 16.

A law signed by Newsom last year requires ballots to be mailed to all voters for any election held in 2021, though voters can choose to relinquish those ballots and participate in person.

Gilliard said he noticed that Newsom’s anti-recall campaign has shifted its political advertising strategy and is calling the recall a “scheme by Trump Republicans to take over California,” a strong indication about the governor’s level of concern.

Newsom has long attempted to tie the recall effort to former President Trump, who was roundly defeated in California by President Biden in the 2020 presidential election. Trump supporters, along with anti-vaccination activists and far-right groups, were early supporters of the recall.

“Californians see this Republican recall for what it is — a blatant attempt by Trump supporters to grab power and impose their agenda on California,” Nathan Click, spokesman for Newsom’s anti-recall campaign, said in a statement. “But Democrats can’t get complacent. The only way to prevent the Republican takeover of California is by voting NO by Sept. 14. If Californians vote, we win.”

The governor‘s anti-recall campaign has ample money to rally Democrats behind him. Newsom and anti-recall committees have raised $32.5 million to defeat the effort, compared with $16.8 million raised by pro-recall efforts and Republican candidates trying to replace him.

DiCamillo said voter interest among Newsom backers may also be tempered because the recall is an unscheduled election, devoid of other races or controversial statewide ballot measures that could gin up turnout. The recall also lacks a prominent Democrat hoping to replace Newsom or the celebrity of a GOP candidate such as Hollywood action star and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who ousted then-Gov. Gray Davis in the 2003 recall election, which became a worldwide spectacle.

The poll results among likely voters were far different than those among the overall electorate, which have remained relatively unchanged when compared to the institute’s surveys in April and January. The new poll found that 36% of registered voters in the state support removing Newsom from office and 51% were opposed.

Political scientist Mindy Romero, director of USC’s Center for Inclusive Democracy, said voter turnout will hinge on a few crucial factors: Do Californians believe the recall election is important to their lives, how consequential will the outcome be to them, and do they think their vote matters?

Romero believes Newsom has the political support and dexterity to defeat the recall. But he needs more than that, she said.

“He doesn’t just want to win, he doesn’t want it to be close,” Romero said. “If it’s close, that in itself essentially looks like a failure.”

Romero also cautioned that potential pitfalls for Newsom remain, including how he responds to the fast-spreading delta variant of COVID-19, which could potentially force new restrictions, and a wildfire season that has already proved to be highly volatile. Mailing all voters a ballot in last year’s presidential election, she said, may have contributed to record turnout.

Californians voting in the Sept. 14 election will receive a ballot with two questions: Should Newsom be recalled from office and, if he is ousted, which replacement candidate should take his place.

If Newsom is recalled, the candidate on the ballot who receives the most votes wins — no matter how many votes he or she receives. The crowded field of candidates is expected to splinter the electorate, which means a Republican who reels in just a small fraction of the vote could become California’s 41st governor. No Republican has won a statewide election in the state since 2006.

In the 2003 recall, more than 55% of voters agreed to remove Davis while less than 49% chose Schwarzenegger to serve out the remainder of Davis’ term. The poll shows the edge belongs to Elder. If elected, the Los Angeles native and longtime talk radio host would become California’s first Black governor.

When asked to pick their first choice among the candidates hoping to take the helm as California’s next governor, 18% of likely voters preferred Elder. Among other Republicans, former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Rancho Santa Fe businessman John Cox, who was trounced by Newsom in the 2018 gubernatorial election, both were backed by 10% of likely voters. Assemblyman Kevin Kiley of Rocklin received support from 5% of those surveyed.

Jenner, a retired gold-medal Olympian and the most famous candidate in the race, was backed by just 3% of likely voters. Jenner is currently in Australia filming a reality television show.

Democrat Kevin Paffrath, a personal finance influencer who has more than 1.6 million followers on YouTube, also registered 3%.

DiCamillo said the vast number of undecided voters, 40%, probably still need more information about the candidates before making a decision in the weeks ahead about whom they might support.

Nearly a quarter of voters, mostly Democrats, said they don’t plan to vote for any of the candidates in the replacement election. If that holds up, Republicans will have much greater influence in deciding who will become the next governor if Newsom is recalled.

The latest effort to recall Newsom is one of six launched since he took office in 2019 and the only one to gather just under the 1.5 million petition signatures from registered voters required to qualify for the ballot.

Shortly after the onset of the pandemic, Newsom enjoyed soaring job approval ratings following his initial response, including imposing the nation’s first statewide stay-at-home order in mid-March.

His support began to decline, as it has for other governors across the country, as people began to chafe over COVID-related lockdowns that put millions out of work, shut down businesses and forced schoolchildren into distance learning programs. Most pandemic-related restrictions in the state have since been lifted.

Last September, 64% of registered voters in California approved of the job Newsom was doing as governor, compared with 36% who disapproved. This month, half of those registered voters gave Newsom good marks, while 42% did not.


Last I saw of fund raising by each side, Reed Hastings was the largest donor supporting Newsom. Hastings is the CEO of Netflix.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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senorgrand wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 11:56 am If Newsom was facing an organized, competent and well-funded republican, he would probably lose. Right now, odds are 2-1 he keeps his job.
Isn’t “ organized, competent and well-funded republican” in California an oxymoron?
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
"We can have democracy in this country, or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." ~ Louis Brandeis,

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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Polls tend to tighten just before elections, so I'm not surprised. Reputable pollster and when the embargo on the poll details have expired I'll post the link. "The shows not over until..."

All state employees are now required to be vaccinated or undergo regular testing along with healthcare workers, I support it but that could have an impact on the recall. Newsom was just about to say at a press conference that it's unconstitutional not to get vaccinated, but quickly changed to unconscionable. He's a clown.

Donors - looks like Newsom, Cox and Faulconer are the main beneficiaries. We can expect a lot of media spending during the last month especially the last few days of the recall election.
https://www.sfchronicle.com/projects/20 ... ll-donors/

Newsom beat Cox by a big margin in 2018. Faulconer is a former two term mayor of San Diego. From the poll, Larry Elder a black conservative lawyer and radio personality is running high in the polls.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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highdesert wrote: Tue Jun 29, 2021 9:20 am

As first reported by Courthouse News, Newsom filed a lawsuit Monday against California Secretary of State Shirley Weber asking the court to require Weber to print Newsom’s party preference on the recall ballots. Weber was confirmed to the post in January after being nominated by Newsom.

In the past, such as in the 2003 recall election targeting then-Gov. Gray Davis, party preference didn’t appear on the ballot next to the names of California elected officials targeted in recall elections. But a 2019 law signed by Newsom changed that.

The California Elections Code now gives officeholders the right to have their party preference listed on the ballot, but only if they file to do so during their initial seven-day window for responding to the recall notice — which in this case would have been in February 2020.

Newsom lost the lawsuit, his name will not appear on the recall ballot as a "Democrat".

Shirley Weber did her job. Newsom signs anything that blows across his desk, this one came back to bite him.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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TrueTexan wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 12:53 pm
senorgrand wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 11:56 am If Newsom was facing an organized, competent and well-funded republican, he would probably lose. Right now, odds are 2-1 he keeps his job.
Isn’t “ organized, competent and well-funded republican” in California an oxymoron?
It is. My point is that the potential failure of the recall is not based on Newsom's strength, but on the Reeps incompetence. It should be a wake-up call for those that think he can run for president
Image


"Person, woman, man, camera, TV."

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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senorgrand wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 3:34 pm Yeah. I kind feel like voting for the recall just because of his stupid anti-2a ballot measure...but dems didn't provide a safety candidate

Yup, looks like Newsom's team threatened any Democrat who even considered running in the recall election. I'd like to see some two party government again in CA, Democrats have a supermajority in the CA legislature and on the CA supreme court.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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highdesert wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:39 pm I'd like to see some two party government again in CA, Democrats have a supermajority in the CA legislature and on the CA supreme court.
Until the Republicans start showing some semblance of sanity, I'll stick with the Democrats...warts and all.
But yeah, in a more perfect world we would have a rational conservative opposition to reign in the left, and the left would reign in the right. That system used to work pretty well.
“I think there’s a right-wing conspiracy to promote the idea of a left-wing conspiracy”

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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FrontSight wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:52 pm
highdesert wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:39 pm I'd like to see some two party government again in CA, Democrats have a supermajority in the CA legislature and on the CA supreme court.
Until the Republicans start showing some semblance of sanity, I'll stick with the Democrats...warts and all.

But yeah, in a more perfect world we would have a rational conservative opposition to reign in the left, and the left would reign in the right. That system used to work pretty well.

Sure there are Trumpers in CA, but there are Republicans all over state that aren't Trumpers. I'm in a purple/red area dominated by Republicans and they're conservative, but they haven't gone overboard. County board and town council are officially non-partisan on the ballot, but I suspect their political affiliation.

Like with any election, we all have to examine the candidates and determine who should get our vote. It's an individual decision.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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FrontSight wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:52 pmUntil the Republicans start showing some semblance of sanity, I'll stick with the Democrats...warts and all.
You can live with warts. You can't live with terminal cancer, which Republicans now are.
"The upper class: keeps all of the money, pays none of the taxes. The middle class: pays all of the taxes, does all of the work. The poor are there...just to scare the shit out of the middle class."--George Carlin

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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FrontSight wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:52 pm
highdesert wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 4:39 pm I'd like to see some two party government again in CA, Democrats have a supermajority in the CA legislature and on the CA supreme court.
Until the Republicans start showing some semblance of sanity, I'll stick with the Democrats...warts and all.
But yeah, in a more perfect world we would have a rational conservative opposition to reign in the left, and the left would reign in the right. That system used to work pretty well.
Hmmm, it used to kind of work before the ReQublicons went Nazi, but it's hardly ideal for the reasons you're now seeing, i.e. it's way too easy to divide the people, "us against them" etc.

I know it's a pipe dream, but it sure would be nice if the best and brightest had a chance to run the show via multiple parties, rather than the most easily bought and corrupted for the two corrupt parties.

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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featureless wrote: Tue Jul 27, 2021 8:43 pm I'll probably vote to recall him. I don't like his smarmy ass, warts and all. There's no one better running, but he, and the rest of the dem super majority need a wake up call that all is not well.

I'm tired of one party rule it reminds me of totalitarian states. I'd like multiple parties but that doesn't guarantee things would move faster, just that there would be more voices to be heard. All political parties want to dominate, it's power.

If Newsom beats the recall, he's up for reelection next year. If he loses, his replacement also has to run for reelection next year. If Newsom is recalled, the candidate winning the most votes becomes governor, they don't have to win a majority of votes.

The most Democratic-like major Republican candidate is Kevin Faulconer, he's pro-choice. He's a Larry Hogan-Charlie Baker-Chris Sununu type Republican.

The full UC poll
https://escholarship.org/content/qt27x9 ... wwdp7&v=lg

The candidates running
https://calmatters.org/explainers/newso ... andidates/
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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highdesert wrote: Wed Jul 28, 2021 9:44 am
I'm tired of one party rule it reminds me of totalitarian states. I'd like multiple parties but that doesn't guarantee things would move faster, just that there would be more voices to be heard. All political parties want to dominate, it's power.
Me too. I've found the CA Democratic path to Utopia to be rather lacking and unrepresentative. Quality of life continues to slip and cost of living continues to increase. I have no problem paying more to receive more service (equitably), but to pay more and more as conditions and services continue to decline seems... Homelessness (that issue Newsom "fixed" in SF) is horrific. Housing costs are astronomical. Education and infrastructure is fucking crumbling. And our water systems--oh boy.

It's time for a shakeup. I'm not saying I want a republican controlled government, more that the Dems need to understand that they cannot continue along the path they are on and expect to retain power. I feel as though they are resting on the 'ol laurels and pursuing pet projects that look good on paper but are executed for shit and/or not funded. Staff turnover and project review times for agencies I work with are unworkable. It's an "all boxes must be checked" rather than "empowered to think outside of the check box to solve real problems" mentality. We've overregulated to the point where good "people helping projects" are chocked out because "studies are too out of date" by the time the fucking reviews happen, so new studies are prepared and placed on the bottom of the pile, rinse and repeat--a colossal waste of time and money while the problem remains unsolved.

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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When Biden's REAL margin of victory was roughly 50,000 votes in Georgia, Arizona, and Wisconsin, despite getting 7 million more ACTUAL votes, something is seriously, SERIOUSLY wrong with the system.
"The upper class: keeps all of the money, pays none of the taxes. The middle class: pays all of the taxes, does all of the work. The poor are there...just to scare the shit out of the middle class."--George Carlin

Re: CA Democratic governor Newsom's recall

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Another poll released a few days before the UC Berkeley/LA Times poll was equally dire for Newsom.
An exclusive Inside California Politics / Emerson College poll found Californians are split when it comes to Governor Gavin Newsom’s performance as the recall election nears.

The exclusive new statewide poll of more than 1,000 registered voters, which has a margin of error of +/-2.9%, shows while Californians support keeping Gov. Newsom in office despite the recall campaign against him, more than half think it’s time for some new leadership in 2022.

Would you vote to recall or to keep Gov. Newsom?

Vote to recall: 43%
Vote to keep Gov. Newsom: 48%
Undecided: 9%

More than 50% of voters must say “yes” they want the governor recalled. Our poll shows he is below that number at this time.

Despite nearly half of respondents saying they would vote to keep Newsom, a majority of Californians believe a change in the governor is needed in 2022 when Newsom is up for re-election.

Regardless of the recall effort, would you vote to re-elect Gov. Newsom in 2022 or do you think it is time for someone new?

Re-elect Gov. Newsom: 42%
Time for someone new: 58%

Nearly half of the respondents approve of how Newsom is performing as governor overall, while 42% disapprove.

Overall, do you approve or disapprove of the job Gov. Gavin Newsom is doing as governor?

Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 42%
Unsure or no opinion: 10%

Earlier this year, Newsom acknowledged mistakes in communicating with the public last year before the first loosening of coronavirus restrictions led to an early summer spike in cases.

The poll found respondents mostly rated Newsom’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic as poor, while 28% rated it as good, 20% said it was excellent, and 19% said it was fair.

How would you rate the job Newsom has done to handle the COVID-19 pandemic – excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Excellent: 20%
Good: 28%
Fair: 19%
Poor: 33%

When it comes to California’s homeless crisis, more than half of respondents rated Newsom’s response as poor. A total 25% voted fair, with 16% voting good. Seven percent of respondents said his response was excellent.

How would you rate the job Gov. Newsom has done to handle homelessness – excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Excellent: 7%
Good: 16%
Fair: 25%
Poor: 52%

When it comes to addressing more specific issues the state is currently facing, 36% of respondents rated Newsom’s response to California wildfires as poor, 30% as good, 22% as fair, and 12% as excellent.

How would you rate the job Gov. Newsom has done to handle California wildfires – excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Excellent: 12%
Good: 30%
Fair: 22%
Poor: 36%

Earlier this month, Newsom asked people and businesses in California to voluntarily cut water use by 15% as the Western United States weathers a drought that is rapidly emptying reservoirs relied on for agriculture, drinking water, and fish habitat. Newsom also added nine counties to an emergency drought proclamation that now covers 50 of the state’s 58 counties.

According to the poll, 35% of respondents said Newsom’s response was poor, 29% voted good, 27% fair, and 9% said excellent.

How would you rate the job Gov. Newsom has done to handle the current drought – excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Excellent: 9%
Good: 29%
Fair: 27%
Poor: 35%

Earlier this month, Newsom asked people and businesses in California to voluntarily cut water use by 15% as the Western United States weathers a drought that is rapidly emptying reservoirs relied on for agriculture, drinking water, and fish habitat. Newsom also added nine counties to an emergency drought proclamation that now covers 50 of the state’s 58 counties.

According to the poll, 35% of respondents said Newsom’s response was poor, 29% voted good, 27% fair, and 9% said excellent.

How would you rate the job Gov. Newsom has done to handle the current drought – excellent, good, fair, or poor?

Excellent: 9%
Good: 29%
Fair: 27%
Poor: 35%
https://www.kron4.com/news/politics/ins ... ion-nears/

Emerson College, Boston is a reputable pollster.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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