Re: How’s the weather

602
As soon as the Pacific storm that is lingering here decides to move east, you could get more rain or it'll just keep going east. It's humid here, 60% in the house and the a/c is running. I'm afraid of dry lightning that could start fires since it's so dry.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: How’s the weather

604
The rains finally came last evening, thunder and lightning to raise the dead, it knocked the power and cable out. Then it stopped and started after midnight, forecasted to be around until noon today. Flash flood warnings.

Wish I could send it up north, but it's heading to Phoenix.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: How’s the weather

606
“Record-shattering” heatwaves, even worse than the one that recently hit north-west America, are set to become much more likely in future, according to research. The study is a stark new warning on the rapidly escalating risks the climate emergency poses to lives.

The shocking temperature extremes suffered in the Pacific north-west and in Australia 2019-2020 were “exactly what we are talking about”, said the scientists. But they said the world had yet to see anything close to the worst impacts possible, even under the global heating that had already happened.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... mate-study

Our models have missed a few things. Expect severe heatwaves to be common, frequent and record shattering. And don't forget, even if we stopped all CO2 emissions today, there are 20 years of temperature increases already baked in, so to speak. We have shit the bed in magnificent fashion.

But today is cool and cloudy. No dry lightning yet, so I'll take it!

Re: How’s the weather

612
That isn’t going to produce much electricity or provide much water. Look how dry the vegetation is. The west is toast, unsustainable and so will be other parts of the US. Global warming is biting us in the butt.
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"Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated!" Loquacious of many. Texas Chapter Chief Cat Herder.

Re: How’s the weather

613
Stunning pictures.
Lake Oroville backs up behind Oroville Dam, 130 miles northeast of San Francisco, just at the point where the forks of the Feather River pour out of the northern Sierra foothills into the Sacramento Valley.

When the reservoir is full, the surface of the lake stands at 900 feet above sea level. The last time it was near that level was a little over two years ago, when it reached 896 feet, or 98% of capacity.

At that level, the lake is holding enough water to supply about 7 million average California households for a year. But our reservoirs are there to be drawn down. In Oroville's case, the water behind the dam is meant to be shipped by way of the Feather and Sacramento rivers, the Delta and California Aqueduct, among other waterways, to water agencies and irrigation districts serving 27 million people and 750,000 acres of farmland.

As we near the end of July 2021 and enter the driest months of the year, Lake Oroville is slowly but surely emptying out. As you've read, heard and no doubt observed, that's because of two straight extremely dry winters. The reservoir now stands at 655 feet, about 27% of capacity.

To make the numbers less abstract, the lake's record low, 645.11 feet, was recorded Sept. 7, 1977, near the end of what was then the state's worst recorded drought. The reservoir has dropped a little more than a foot a day on average this month as the Department of Water Resources, which manages Oroville Dam, makes releases to meet water quality and wildlife requirements.

The water agency has warned that it will be forced to suspend the operation of Oroville's hydroelectric power plant when the lake reaches the 630 to 640 foot level. At the current rate of decline, the lake could reach that point in the next 10 to 15 days.
https://www.kqed.org/news/11882312/lake ... as-drought
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: How’s the weather

615
In a better light. Our 125 year drought has come to an end with a total of 8 inches of rain in about a month. The dang saguaros were almost toast. Lots of prickly pear and other cacti were dying off.
Here's a creek near my house running nicely and back to normal. Streams in the desert.
Redneck Liberal This Is The Way
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Re: How’s the weather

616
Tough choice: no water, no food. Farmers feed us.

Back in '77 we saw all kinds of interesting ways to cope. Restaurants no longer served water or had working bathrooms. Bet we'll see that again. Long range forecasts in the best scenarios suggest "normal" rainfall this wet season, la nina.

CDFingers
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Wave that flag--wave it wide and high
Summer time gonna come and go, my oh, my.

Re: How’s the weather

618
Two days ago Texas had only 2-3 small areas that were considered in drought with the biggest in Big Bend Area, which isn't abnormal for that desert region. SATX (airport official station) recorded rain fall is in mid 20" area, but they stated some areas here had exceeded 35" in Bexar county. Last year was 33" for entire year as I recall.

I don't water jack. Decided few years back that if nature can't do it, it won't get done. Outside of bathing myself and Jake (the Boxer), filling his wading pool and water buckets full, flushing toilets and washing dishes and clothes and keeping a bed and one trough of fresh mint alive (for drinks), rinsing off porches, that's about it. Think last time F150 washed was 15 + years ago. I really took retirement to heart !! LOL
"Being Republican is more than a difference of opinion - it's a character flaw." "COVID can fix STUPID!"
The greatest, most aggrieved mistake EVER made in USA was electing DJT as POTUS.

Re: How’s the weather

620
lurker wrote: Fri Jul 30, 2021 9:59 pm 94, "feels like" 103. still, i managed to cut the back yard before dark.
the hi is supposed to drop down into the upper 70s by tuesday.
That never made sense to me growing up in the New York area where it's ALWAYS humid when it's hot. 94° "feels" like 94°!
Worst day I ever saw was working on setting up an outdoor show near the Staten Island boardwalk in 1975. Temp was 114° and the air was so thick you could cut it and you couldn't see the sun. First time I ever saw a woman in a string bikini and my 20 year old jaw dropped to my boots! Still, to me, THAT is what 114° feels like!

We had 1.2" of rain last night and it turned into a MAGNIFICENT day! Topped out at 81°, sunny, with a nice, steady breeze blowing! GREAT day to be outside!
"The upper class: keeps all of the money, pays none of the taxes. The middle class: pays all of the taxes, does all of the work. The poor are there...just to scare the shit out of the middle class."--George Carlin

Re: How’s the weather

622
Late afternoon yesterday a thunder storm blew in with plenty of loud claps of thunder, a little lightning and a cool 81F. Forecast showed rain by 6 pm, even got a flash flood warning on my mobile. 6 pm came and went and nothing all night, another teaser storm moved east.

Overcast with a high of 88F today but triple digits Wednesday then back into the 90s. I have a hygrometer in the house to measure humidity and it's showing normal, can't remember a summer showing normal humidity, it always shows dry. The drought continues.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: How’s the weather

623
Hot and humid. Forecast cooler next week with highs in mid 90s and fair chance of rain
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
"We can have democracy in this country, or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." ~ Louis Brandeis,

Re: How’s the weather

625
June heatwave was the ‘most extreme’ on record for North America

The devastating heatwave that struck the Northwest US and southwest Canada in June was “the most extreme summer heatwave” ever recorded in North America, according to a new analysis from nonprofit research group Berkeley Earth. That’s based on the magnitude of the heatwave, or how much warmer it was than normal. Record temperatures in the region reached roughly 20 degrees Celsius (or 36 °F) hotter than average in June.

Canada recorded its hottest temperature ever on June 29th when the village of Lytton in British Columbia reached an astonishing 49.6 degrees Celsius (121 degrees Fahrenheit). Typical temperatures there in June are closer to 20 to 30 degrees Celsius (68 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit).

The consequences of that heat are staggering. Scorching temperatures fed wildfires, which burned down 90 percent of Lytton. There were at least 570 heat-related deaths in Canada and at least 194 in the US. Thousands more people wound up in emergency departments.

The late June heatwave was a “1,000-year event…hopefully,” according to a preliminary analysis by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The severity of the heat would have been “virtually impossible” without human-caused climate change, both NOAA and a separate analysis from an international team of researchers found.

For the entire Northern Hemisphere, it was the warmest June on record averaged across all land areas. Nearly 4 percent of the surface of the Earth hit record high average temperatures during the first half of 2021, according to the Berkeley Earth analysis. That’s despite the cooling effect of a La Niña event. Looking at the first six months of the year, “Nowhere has been record cold,” tweeted Berkeley Earth lead scientist Robert Rohde.

Globally, the odds of more “record-shattering” heatwaves like the one that took such a huge toll in the US and Canada in June are likely on the rise. Prolonged, record-breaking extreme heat events are two to seven times more likely to take place from now until 2050 compared to the previous three decades, according to research published earlier this week. That estimate is based on a scenario in which greenhouse gas emissions stay high, like they are today. There’s still some hope of avoiding that future — but first, humanity will have to stop burning quite so many fossil fuels.
https://www.theverge.com/2021/7/30/226 ... th-america

As if we didn’t already know that.
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
"We can have democracy in this country, or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." ~ Louis Brandeis,

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