And they're off - Britain goes to the polls on July 4th.

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Britain's Conservative Party has been in power for 14 years and Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is betting that a mid summer election will return him to power. Sunak is the 5th Conservative prime minister during those 14 years - David Cameron, Theresa May, Boris Johnson and Liz Truss proceeded Sunak. The King will dissolve Parliament on May 30th, British general elections are only 6 weeks long, we could learn something from them.
Rishi Sunak has fired the starting pistol on the general election - it will take place on 4 July, writes BBC senior political analyst Peter Barnes. The opinion polls suggest his Conservative Party is starting the campaign a long way behind its main rival, the Labour Party. In fact, that's been pretty much the picture for the last 12 months, with Labour consistently polling above 40%. Of course, opinion polls can be wrong, and Mr Sunak will be hoping that improving economic news, and a focus on the parties' policy platforms, will help the Conservatives turn things around as the campaign progresses.
As things stand, though, Labour start the campaign with a commanding poll lead.

Reform UK are in third place but with their support spread evenly around the country it could be hard to turn that support into seats in Parliament. The Liberal Democrats have been fairly consistently at about 10% on average, but they hope that by focusing on their target seats they can make gains when it comes to the election. The Greens have seen their poll ratings edge up in recent weeks and they will also be concentrating their efforts where they think they can win.
For the SNP and Plaid Cymru, GB-wide polls aren't a good way of gauging their levels of support in Scotland and Wales respectively. Now the campaign has started, there are likely to be many more polls than normal, including polls in each nation of the UK.
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-68079726

The Conservative Party is center -right, the Labour Party is center-left, the Reform Party is center-right and the Liberal Democratic Party is center-left. The Scottish National Party is in the midst of a corruption scandal involving their former party leader and Plaid Cymru is a Wales independence party.

We'll see who wins on July 4th. Unlike the US there is no lame-duck period in Britain, the winner will be announced on July 5th and the winner will go to Buckingham Palace and be appointed by the King. In the US the election is over on November 5, 2024, but a new president isn't sworn in until January 6, 2025.
Last edited by highdesert on Fri May 24, 2024 8:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: And they're off - Britain goes to the polls on July 4th.

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TrueTexan wrote: Thu May 23, 2024 4:51 pm
highdesert wrote: Thu May 23, 2024 1:37 pm In the US the election is over on November 5, 2024, but a new president isn't sworn in until January 6, 2025.
Is that sworn in or sworn at?
Depends on who wins and which end of the political spectrum you are on.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Re: And they're off - Britain goes to the polls on July 4th.

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Eris wrote: Thu May 23, 2024 11:49 pm They vote on our Independence Day
We vote on their Guy Fawkes Night
Good catch Eris !

As of May 22nd, Labour (socialist) is at 45%; Conservatives are at 23%; Reform is at 11%; Liberal Democrats are at 9%; and the Greens are at 6%. If Labour holds it looks like Sir Keir Starmer will be the next prime minister and the "removals company" (movers) will move Sunak out of and Starmer into No. 10 Downing Street, Whitehall within a day.
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-68079726
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan

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