Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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My sincere thanks to our brave brother-in-arms Bisbee, for taking an hour or so out of his busy day to strip, lube, and reassemble the bratty, light-striking 942.

I was feeling good because the previous week, I did finally muster the courage to take apart the Mark II, try to clean it (it was nearly spotless) and reassemble it, which helped me troubleshoot one of its two problems.

But the Taurus required skills at a completely different level that I knew I didn't have. A few notes from my notes, as it were, as I watched Bisbee work:

First, you need to find an awl or other implement the right diameter, and bang out the pin that holds the rubber grip on the frame (from the right side, extracting the pin from the left with pliers if needed). Who wants to use a hammer on their gun in any context whatsoever?! Sunrise is nervous about this conceptually, so it's lucky that the other guy on this job had nerves of steel.

Then, unscrew the screws beneath the handle (with non-beveled, gunsmith screwdrivers.) The screw above the trigger often has a spring, but this one just had some kind of cap.

Many of you know the other steps -- tap the face plate (oddly, not from the opposite side-- I gotta ask Bisbee about that) with a rubber mallet or similar.

And of course there is the paper clip in the base of the mainspring, in the hole in the mainspring rod closest to the handle. Remove the mainspring. Then remove the hammer. Lots of steps I didn't jot down, just thinks to remember: Like that the cylinder spindle may be threaded backwards.)

He took it apart nearly completely. I think the spring-pin assembly for the detent or flange that locks the cylinder in position (visible in the shot w/ no hammer) might have stayed in, but every other surface of every other part was carefully cleaned and lubricated.

We'd heard-- and Bisbee has observed on other Tauruses, I believe, that there might be "metal shavings" inside from shoddy manufacturing. That makes you think of wood shavings on a shop floor, but what we found was far more subtle: Metal shavings that looked more like dirt or even gunpowder, but just had a slightly different consistency. Our working theory is this was adding friction somewhere around the hammer, or even around the transfer bar-- ooh, a few tricky moments getting THAT back in place-- and slowing down the hammer: Thus the 'gritty' feeling, with occasional squeaking even after I'd tried to lube it earlier, AND a vague sense of inconsistent timing, that the trigger was breaking a little different every time, the hammer falling at a slightly different point in it's travel. And it wasn't completely consistent even in single action.

We didn't find anything terribly heinous... just a little bit of gritty metal residue. And the parts were machined pretty smooth, nothing coarse, nothing seemed to need any polishing.

And yet-- once we had it cleaned, lubed, and put back together? It felt like a different gun, even just with snap caps. Wasn't super dramatic, but the way the cylinder cycled and hammer fell when you pull the trigger just seemed more consistent-- and much smoother.

It may be weeks before I can get back to the range -- my busy season at work -- but I have a good feeling about this! Also great to actually meet an LGC member in person-- only the second time I've met an online friend in person EVER-- and talk guns (mostly) and cars and philosophy/psychology, just a little.

Our Takeaway, if we had one, might have been something like this: There is a lot of fear about taking apart an unfamiliar gun. Yeah, I've got bad arthritis, and the 942 is a bit different from other Tauruses Bisbee has worked on, but for the tricky bits, a lot of it is just taking deep breaths, thinking positive, and gently putting aside any worry that you won't be able to put the gun back together again. Or that some spring will go flying and roll away someplace where you can never find it.

That was fun! Pretty sure we made it a lot better-- definitely didn't make it worse! And no leftover parts after we put it back together!

Just a couple of pics...

Cocked.jpeg
With trigger no hammer.jpeg

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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To remove the side cover you remove the three screws then tap firmly on the frame of the gun (handle area) with a plastic-lined mallet. The cover pops lose from a sudden shock without prying on it from below.

We found the new Taurus innards are largely cast MIM parts with rounded edges. Very nice actually and prevents any faces that require stoning to polish off flashing or machining marks.

I felt cheated… S&W innards usually need stoning and polishing for the action to feel smooth. How dare Taurus do this to us!
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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So far, my 6.5" 692 Tracker has been smooth as silk, both in 9mm and .357 magnum/.38 special. In .357, it has less recoil and is easier to shoot accurately than my Ruger 1771 (which is 4.2"). The matte S/S fit and finish aren't as nearly as nice as the polished S/S Ruger, and the Ruger's grip is not only far superior, the rubber and hardwood (Dark cherry? It looks like rosewood) looks far better.
"Even if the bee could explain to the fly why pollen is better than shit, the fly could never understand."

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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YankeeTarheel wrote: Wed Apr 05, 2023 7:32 am So far, my 6.5" 692 Tracker has been smooth as silk, both in 9mm and .357 magnum/.38 special. In .357, it has less recoil and is easier to shoot accurately than my Ruger 1771 (which is 4.2"). The matte S/S fit and finish aren't as nearly as nice as the polished S/S Ruger, and the Ruger's grip is not only far superior, the rubber and hardwood (Dark cherry? It looks like rosewood) looks far better.
Whoa-- the Trackers are really interesting! And holy crap, the .22s are convertibles! I didn't even know that was a thing in DA! (Though I notice the .22 Trackers aren't available in 2.5 inch barrel. But I guess a convertible wouldn't make much sense with a barrel that short, b/c the difference in muzzle velocity between LR and WMR would be pretty minimal.) Bummer that these aren't on the CA roster in any caliber. (And I still don't understand why the 942 is, even though it was released in 2020.) Also interesting that the 2.5 inch barrel Trackers are about an inch and half longer in overall length than the 2 inch barrel 942. What do you think, YT, do those 'gas expansion chambers' really reduce recoil in .357/.38 special? That would be appealing... and huh, if that's at the end of the barrel, maybe that's why it's 1.4 inches longer overall despite the barrel being only .5 inches longer.

I see what you mean about the grip on the 692 in stainless-- it's really weird that it's different from the grip on the matte black version, which looks just like the 942. I do like the 942's grip a lot ergonomically, I wonder why the 692 stainless is different, why they have two different styles of grip for the same model?

When I first looked at the 942, I just assumed I would replace the grips with wood at some point, like I did for the Rough Rider. Wood is more appealing aesthetically, for sure. But once I held it, I was like, "Not so fast." The thumb rest, and the half-cutout for the third finger, really make it far easy to hold. I'm definitely not changing the grips anytime soon, or ever, unless it was wood that was pretty much exactly the same shape, and with not-completely-smooth texture in the right places.

Sik, it's really weird making the transition to such a short barrel! The first shot or two, I thought, "Wow, this is more accurate than I thought." (Well, at 10 yards or so!) But then my next shots were totally wild, and I realized, "Okay, I just totally stopped focusing-- I thought I was lining up the rear and front sights, but I actually wasn't thinking." Or I was lining up the rear sight with some other point on the top of the barrel, or just having a micro brain fart, I'm not sure. It's almost like because the platform is shorter, it's easier to get visually confused. I have that issue generally: The first few shots from a cylinder or mag are always my most accurate. But with the snubby, the issue is more dramatic. It's like when I'm really concentrating, it's only slightly less accurate than my other .22s, but when I'm NOT concentrating, it's significantly less accurate.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Yes, sight radius is “a thing”. And you ain’t got much of it to play with in a snubbie.

I once owned a bolt action .22 rimfire rifle that had a something ridiculous like a 24” barrel. Anything past 16” or so tends to slow down the .22lr bullet for so a long barrel like that was acting like a silencer of sorts. You could literally shoot .22 shorts out of it without ear protection and it would be fun. Anyway, the rifle was so accurate with iron sights it shot like nothing else I’ve ever owned before. It was magical, like a rifle possessed! Everyone who shot it felt that way. In the end we concluded it was the loooooomg sight radius between the rear sight and the front end of the barrel that made the gun seem super stable and easy to hit targets with.

Gee, I wonder if blow-guns display that same feeling of stability & control?
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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About the snubnose and intended use, I recommend reading Grant Cunningham’s book.
https://www.grantcunningham.com/informa ... lver-book/
While taking practice shots at 10 yards might be fun, the snubnose is a gun that excels at being close. Practicing the technique of shooting a snubnose one realizes that sight radius is not a key ingredient and not really how one shoots one. Reading Cunningham’s book will give you a better idea. Also he’s taught snubnose use at some of our national meets. I look forward to taking a course one day on snubnose use. It’s a tool perfect for what it was intended.
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"Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated!" Loquacious of many. Texas Chapter Chief Cat Herder.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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SunRiseWest wrote: Wed Apr 05, 2023 11:09 pm
YankeeTarheel wrote: Wed Apr 05, 2023 7:32 am So far, my 6.5" 692 Tracker has been smooth as silk, both in 9mm and .357 magnum/.38 special. In .357, it has less recoil and is easier to shoot accurately than my Ruger 1771 (which is 4.2"). The matte S/S fit and finish aren't as nearly as nice as the polished S/S Ruger, and the Ruger's grip is not only far superior, the rubber and hardwood (Dark cherry? It looks like rosewood) looks far better.
Whoa-- the Trackers are really interesting! And holy crap, the .22s are convertibles! I didn't even know that was a thing in DA! (Though I notice the .22 Trackers aren't available in 2.5 inch barrel. But I guess a convertible wouldn't make much sense with a barrel that short, b/c the difference in muzzle velocity between LR and WMR would be pretty minimal.) Bummer that these aren't on the CA roster in any caliber. (And I still don't understand why the 942 is, even though it was released in 2020.) Also interesting that the 2.5 inch barrel Trackers are about an inch and half longer in overall length than the 2 inch barrel 942. What do you think, YT, do those 'gas expansion chambers' really reduce recoil in .357/.38 special? That would be appealing... and huh, if that's at the end of the barrel, maybe that's why it's 1.4 inches longer overall despite the barrel being only .5 inches longer.

I see what you mean about the grip on the 692 in stainless-- it's really weird that it's different from the grip on the matte black version, which looks just like the 942. I do like the 942's grip a lot ergonomically, I wonder why the 692 stainless is different, why they have two different styles of grip for the same model?

When I first looked at the 942, I just assumed I would replace the grips with wood at some point, like I did for the Rough Rider. Wood is more appealing aesthetically, for sure. But once I held it, I was like, "Not so fast." The thumb rest, and the half-cutout for the third finger, really make it far easy to hold. I'm definitely not changing the grips anytime soon, or ever, unless it was wood that was pretty much exactly the same shape, and with not-completely-smooth texture in the right places.

Sik, it's really weird making the transition to such a short barrel! The first shot or two, I thought, "Wow, this is more accurate than I thought." (Well, at 10 yards or so!) But then my next shots were totally wild, and I realized, "Okay, I just totally stopped focusing-- I thought I was lining up the rear and front sights, but I actually wasn't thinking." Or I was lining up the rear sight with some other point on the top of the barrel, or just having a micro brain fart, I'm not sure. It's almost like because the platform is shorter, it's easier to get visually confused. I have that issue generally: The first few shots from a cylinder or mag are always my most accurate. But with the snubby, the issue is more dramatic. It's like when I'm really concentrating, it's only slightly less accurate than my other .22s, but when I'm NOT concentrating, it's significantly less accurate.
Yeah, those 8 little vertical ports at the muzzle really DO work to prevent barrel rise! The first time I shot it, at 10(?) yards in 9mm, I couldn't believe how much easier it was to shoot accurately than the 1771 Ruger. Ironically, my son, who never shot a wheel gun before, just didn't like it all all, preferring my 620 Sig, which he has a different version of. The 692 has a grip that reminds me of the "porcupine" motorcycle grips of the late 60's and early 70's that you think would be comfortable but aren't, unlike the later closed-cell foam ones. I'm not familiar with the black's grip so I cannot comment on it.

While the Chiappa Rhino's solution to barrel rise is super-cool, I think that Taurus's solution is far simpler and definitely more elegant. The ONE problem I see is they don't provide a really tiny brush for cleaning those 8 little ports (4 on each side). I'll make a WAG that those ports bleed off enough of the gas expansion to make the muzzle FPS be the same as a 6" rather than a 6.5" barrel, an insignificant loss of velocity.
"Even if the bee could explain to the fly why pollen is better than shit, the fly could never understand."

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Just got back from the range. The 942 is still light striking... but there was definitely some improvement after Bisbee's disassemble/reassemble and deep cleaning.

It was an interesting hour-- that's all I can take, though my stamina was better today. I brought the Makarov (who I have named "Spectre," AKA "The Thug"), the Rough Rider, and the 942. My focus was breaking in / checking out the 942, but I wanted to check an issue with the Mak not chambering the first round with a trigger pull, and I figured today I would try whatever rounds the 942 didn't shoot with the Rough Rider instead of the Mark II, because the Mark II... is going through its own process.

The first, third, and fourth cylinders were depressing -- three misfires out of eight cartridges! But I all the others were better, and they seemed to improve towards the end of the session.

* I did not have any cylinder with no misfires, but towards the end of the hour, I had several with only one, and a few with only two. My first two trips to the range, it was the reverse: At the start of the hour, I had a few cylinders with only one or two misfires, thereafter usually three or more.
* I did not have a cylinder with four misfires. That happened two or three times before the deep cleaning.
* The Aguila ammo does seem more problematic than my ancient Remmington Golden bullets. Most of my cylinders with three light-strikes were Aguila, though I think one was a Remmington.
* I do not think speed of trigger pull is a significant variable. A decisive and quick trigger pull was as likely to cause a light strike as a slow, steady one.
* All of the ammo that the 942 couldn't handle, the Rough Rider blasted through with one exception: I had one dud Remmington cartridge that wouldn't fire with either gun.
* On most, but not all, of the light strikes, it did feel like the timing was off. The trigger and hammer were just not working together consistently-- the hammer was dropping more quickly, or the trigger seemed to require less pressure, or some subtle something felt different. How is that possible?! I dunno.
* There was some keyholing, and I was way less accurate with it than with the other two, though that's not surprising since the barrel is so much shorter.

--> It was cool having the RR and the 942 at the range at the same time. I was really surprised at how much more accurate, and how much quieter, the Rough Rider was. I may have even been more accurate with it than I was with the Mark II last time. Man, I'm glad I got that gun. It's surprisingly consistent, and no keyholing today. It probably was keyholing the first day at the range-- I chalked that up to the paper target flapping at the time, but now I think it's shooting better.

--> I only shot around 10 rounds with the Mak, but I was stunned to discover that I'm actually getting better with it. The recoil is still a bit painful, but less distracting. I'm not flinching as much. Bummer that I have to rack the slide for the first shot! I'd thought maybe I'd left the safety on last time I had this problem. Nope. But I am getting used to Spectre, and this may be my MO: Bring it to the range each time I go and just shoot a clip or two. I need to do some research and try to figure out why that first round is only chambering if I rack the slide.

The 942 has now shot about 250 rounds. @Bisbee, it definitely improved a bit, so I think the work we (mostly you) did was worth our time and effort. As I see it, I now have four or five options, but new ideas are welcome:

1) Put another 250-750 rounds through the 942 and see if it breaks in somehow. There's no harm in this option, I suppose-- I know that sometimes guns need to break in, but I'm curious whether folks feel the gun might improve on its own with no intervention, or if I'm just wasting my time and ammo (cheap though it is.)
2) Similar to #1, but try different kinds of ammo. So far, I've tried two different flavors of Aguila and the Remmington.
3) Take it to a local gunsmith.
4) Send it back to Taurus. I would hate to have to do this, because their service does not have the best rep, it will take forever-- and do I have to pay two different FFL fees to do this and go through DROS just to ship it? ! Does anyone have any CA-specific guidance on this?
5) The gun was shipped from Kentucky, I don't think KYGUNCO can be much help, but I could ask them.

Thanks for your thoughts and feedback...

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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When shipping back to the manufacturer for warranty work In most states the owner can ship via UPS OR FedEx directly without an FFL. Only FFL holders can use USPS’s lower rates. But receiving the gun back must be via an FFL.

Are CA laws any different?

I’m curious whether your 942 light primer strikes was happening mainly when firing double action or fairly consistent when cocking the hammer back for single action firing as well. This would help narrow down the troubleshooting.
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Bisbee wrote: When shipping back to the manufacturer for warranty work In most states the owner can ship via UPS OR FedEx directly without an FFL. Only FFL holders can use USPS’s lower rates. But receiving the gun back must be via an FFL.

Are CA laws any different?

I’m curious whether your 942 light primer strikes was happening mainly when firing double action or fairly consistent when cocking the hammer back for single action firing as well. This would help narrow down the troubleshooting.
I didn't shoot much SA with the 942-- except once, when I switched from the RR to the 942 and just cocked it SA instinctively. However, last trip to the range (before we worked on it), it had problems in SA as well. (Does that suggest a firing pin or transfer bar issue?)

I think it is worth going to the range at least once more (after giving the gun a quick cleaning, at least, not a deep cleaning), trying some different ammo for four cylinders, then trying SA for four cylinders, then going back to DA for a few more, this time keeping track of how it does. Just for the hell of it, I should try a cylinder of Stingers-- I think that's the only other kind of .22 ammo I have that I haven't tried yet.

I'm glad it's a bit more reliable, but the reviews I read said 942s were usually good right out of the box. I am learning a lot, though, and getting more comfortable-- and safer-- with the gun.

That is helpful about the FFL, I will gather more information before shipping.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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wings wrote: Sat May 20, 2023 9:16 pm Was it all one brand / type of ammo? You should try a variety before you blame the gun.

Light strikes in a variety of ammo suggests that you need a heavier spring. It will affect trigger pull, but rimfire revolvers are notorious for needing a heavy spring for reliable detonation.
I think you are right that I absolutely have to try different types of ammo, as I have tried only three.

Aguila Interceptor and Aguila High Velocity were the worst, my ancient Golden Bullets were actually more reliable, though all the light strikes went bang when I tried them in the Rough Rider except for a single dud which wouldn't fire in either gun. So I've only tried three kinds of ammunition.

* Any thoughts on what would be the least prone to light strikes? I hear good things about CCI, and Velocitors are among Lucky Gunner's favorites. I do have one box of Stingers, but they are at least 10 years old, and Lucky Gunner really didn't like their performance in gel testing.

I'm still thinking it's some kind of timing issue, just because of how the action feels.

Also, I've read different things about breaking in a revolver. One school of thought is, either they are good out of the box, or they aren't. But I've also heard that it takes 500 to 1000 rounds to really know what's up.

I think it's hard to get a heavier spring for the 942, probably not something Taurus would do-- if that were the problem, a gunsmith would be a better route to go.... but I'm thinking I have more testing to do, I'm not there yet.

I probably should have joined the range-- break even is about seven trips a year, and I think I've gone four times in six months.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Actually, Sunrise may be into something. To me lite primer strikes in single-action on a gun straight from the factory where there is no indication of the hammer dragging implies a problem with the firing pin more than spring rate. If there is no noticeable change between DA and SA, it kinda rules out the main-spring. (Single-action has that hammer flying from much further back for greater inertia.)

Maybe the firing-pin is too short?
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Bisbee wrote: Sat May 20, 2023 11:35 pm Actually, Sunrise may be into something. To me lite primer strikes in single-action on a gun straight from the factory where there is no indication of the hammer dragging implies a problem with the firing pin more than spring rate. If there is no noticeable change between DA and SA, it kinda rules out the main-spring. (Single-action has that hammer flying from much further back for greater inertia.)

Maybe the firing-pin is too short?
Yeah, could be.

Could also be that the cartridges aren't fully seated-- I've read about that being a problem, because if the edge of the cartridge isn't flush with the cylinder, only part of the kinetic energy gets transmitted to the primer, some of it is wasted pushing the cartridge all the way in. I will say this: The cartridges are pretty loose, and many fall right into my hand when I swing the cylinder open. It that were the case, breaking in might help-- a little carbon deposits on the inside of the chambers could decrease the diameter enough for them to seat tighter.

Another thing I heard: I need to make note of which cylinders don't fire, see if there are any that are less likely to fire.

I found a single old box of Winchester ammo. What I need to do is go back to the range, and try at least four other types of ammo-- preferably including some CCI or other high-quality rounds. Make sure that the cartridges are seated securely-- seems like I shouldn't need to pay attention to that, but I will. Then run a few cylinders of each brand through, both single action and double, check which cylinders aren't firing, and take notes.

Also, when I clean the gun, I'm not going to clean the chambers, just the barrel, cylinder face, and the other usual places.

My hunch, though, is that it's some subtle and inconsistent problem in the timing. For the hell of it, I pulled out my cheap starter's pistol in the garage, and dry fired it a bunch-- that thing is terrible, every trigger pull feels totally different. This feels like a super-subtle version of the same problem.

After the work we did, there's absolutely nothing left to lubricate, that's for sure. BTW, we had a very sticky lock at our house-- it was getting worse and worse, to the point I was afraid of being locked out-- and since Ballistol is fine to use on locks (unlike most most oils) I gave it a spray. Holy mother of God, that stuff is amazing-- one little jet of that stuff, and it was like a new lock.

But even if something is a little off in the timing, it might be solved with a heavier spring or a longer firing pin-- if the impact generally had more kinetic energy, a little variation might not matter.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Great write up. So often the recommendation for new shooters is to get a revolver because of simplicity. We need to be clear -- the simplicity is in the manual of arms. Actually disassembly is pretty easy too. But reassembly is not for the faint of heart. I've only taken apart a single action (Ruger Blackhawk) to replace the hammer with a Super Blackhawk hammer. I imagine a double action is even more complicated.

Regarding the snubnose discussion above. Like sika said, it's specifically a short range weapon and probably great for that. Not my thing because I don't carry, and when I have a gun I'm out in the woods or at the range. That's where sight radius is your friend. The 6-1/2" barrel on my Ruger Blackhawk gives me almost 9" sight radius. And that almost makes me look like a good shooter. Almost.

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Hmm... updated this a few days but it didn't seem to post. Trying Again:

Anyhow, I got around to going to Redstone firearms in Burbank to see if they had any clue how the fuck I'm supposed to get warranty service done on the Taurus -- would it be the same paperwork as if I bought it a second time? Thankfully, no-- and man, definitely the nicest staff at any gun store I've been to in Los Angeles so far (someone here recommended them, and I'm happy to patronize a minority owned business.) And it's not like the folks in the other stores were jerks, either. They also do gunsmithing, and think they know what was wrong with the gun.

It's an interesting place: No sign out front at all-- in fact, the only sign is for a different business, a U-Haul rental. Redstone has been flagged recently for extra scrutiny-- I think because some guns they sold were used in crimes, but also for some other capricious reason. I can't remember exactly what the article said, but it doesn't MEAN anything except 'We Are Watching You,' I don't think... so I guess I also felt sorta bad for them. Anyway, you walk in, and are either greeted right away, or wait all of about five minutes. My first visit, the sales rep explained that it just has to be shipped from an FFL and returned to an FFL. No second DROS, no transfer fees, just the shipping charges-- For $35, I'm surprised that they even were willing to do it!

Anyway, they had a look at it, and their theory is... (drumroll, please) Firing pin sheared. It's just not quite long enough, doesn't make full contact with the rim. Of course, I said, "That's so bizarre, it's always been like that, and I never dry fired it..." And they just chuckled and said, "Don't bother trying to figure it out, it's not uncommon." They said they sold a Ruger recently that had several different problems right out of the box.

Fastest possible turnaround would be about a month. When the 942 comes back, I'll have 'em look at the Makarov...

And if they're right, it's none of the things @Bisbee and I suspected. Seems like an odd problem to have-- it must have been just a tiny piece of the firing pin that broke off, or it wouldn't have fired at all, and it was usually shooting six out of eight. But that would explain why cleaning the hell out of it didn't help!

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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🤔
Well that would simply be too easy.
And I have my doubts.
Can you take a closeup photo of the firing pin when it is protruding? May be tricky to finagle the gun to do so but pull the trigger and keep it pulled while the cylinder is open for the photo.
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

Re: Naked Taurus 942: Tear Down, Clean, Lube, and Reassemble

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Yeah, me, too. Seems like we looked at every single part of that gun a half dozen times. I might not have noticed a sheared firing pin, but you probably would have, unless it's something crazy subtle, like a little chip off the end. I can't take a photo of it now-- it's on its way back to Georgia. That would have been a good idea!

I'll definitely keep you posted. It will likely be three weeks at least. Thanks for checking in, hope all is well with you!

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