What Book You Reading?

Reviews and discussions of books, TV, music, etc - firearm related or not.

Moderators: admin, Inquisitor, ForumModerator, WebsiteContent

Message
Author
User avatar
Bisbee
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 5959
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2012 6:38 pm
Location: On The Border with no need of The Wall.
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#451 Post by Bisbee » Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:13 pm

spara wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:18 pm
A Book of Bees and How to Keep them by Sue Hubbell.

I've been wanting to keep bees for a while and I'm planning to take the plunge in 2019.
That is super cool, Spara. 😎

I’ve never kept bees on my own but have helped neighbors with their hives and had another friend who was a professional bee keeper who drove his hives all up and down the west coast to help orchard growers with their fruit and nut trees during spring. I’ve always had an affinity for honey bees. Have only been stung a handful of times which did hurt but wasn’t terrible. I believe there is even use of bee stings for arthritis treatments or something strange like that.
🐝
"It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent." -Gandhi

User avatar
spara
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 1351
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:42 pm
Location: San Antonio
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#452 Post by spara » Sun Dec 16, 2018 1:13 pm

Bisbee wrote:
Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:13 pm
spara wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:18 pm
A Book of Bees and How to Keep them by Sue Hubbell.

I've been wanting to keep bees for a while and I'm planning to take the plunge in 2019.
That is super cool, Spara. 😎

I’ve never kept bees on my own but have helped neighbors with their hives and had another friend who was a professional bee keeper who drove his hives all up and down the west coast to help orchard growers with their fruit and nut trees during spring. I’ve always had an affinity for honey bees. Have only been stung a handful of times which did hurt but wasn’t terrible. I believe there is even use of bee stings for arthritis treatments or something strange like that.
🐝
Hives are on their way, I've got place to put them on a friend's land, and the bees will be ready for pickup in April. I've taken a couple of extension courses and I've been reading up on it but the interest in the Sue Hubbell book came out reading her obituary. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/18/obit ... -dead.html

User avatar
lurker
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 10040
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2014 11:00 pm
Location: spencer, nc.
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#453 Post by lurker » Sun Dec 16, 2018 3:23 pm

Season V. a semi-fictional account of author's experience in vietnam. semi-fiction because apparently some of it is still classified. names have been changed to protect.... somebody.
a little uneven, i'm hoping he hits his groove as we go on. i don't read much since i dropped out of grad school, skimming 3 books a week takes the fun out of it.
stupid humans.

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#454 Post by HuckleberryFun » Wed Dec 26, 2018 8:59 pm

Finland At War: the Winter War 1939-1940, by Vesa Nenye
22EAE42E-03D2-4E2E-B5D4-5BF4EC11E35A.jpeg
22EAE42E-03D2-4E2E-B5D4-5BF4EC11E35A.jpeg (46.26 KiB) Viewed 1067 times
The publisher’s blurb:
The story of the 'Winter War' between Finland and Soviet Russia is a dramatic David versus Goliath encounter. When close to half a million Soviet troops poured into Finland in 1939 it was expected that Finnish defences would collapse in a matter of weeks. But they held firm. The Finns not only survived the initial attacks but succeeded in inflicting devastating casualties before superior Russian numbers eventually forced a peace settlement. This is a rigorously detailed and utterly compelling guide to Finland's vital, but almost forgotten role in the cataclysmic World War II. It reveals the untold story of iron determination, unparalleled skill and utter mastery of winter warfare that characterized Finland's fight for survival on the hellish Eastern Front. Finland at War: the Winter War 1939-40 is the premiere English-language history of the fighting performance of the Finns, drawing on first-hand accounts and previously unpublished photographs to explain just how they were able to perform military feats that nearly defy belief.
When I’m done I have volume 2 ready to read...
Finland At War: The Continuation and Lapland Wars 1941-1945
ImageImage

User avatar
ViktyrGehrig
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2018 1:19 am
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#455 Post by ViktyrGehrig » Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:23 pm

Jenna Moreci's The Savior's Champion. And Aleron Kong's The Land: Founding.

My shit isn't LitRPG, but it has lot of 8-Bit influences... so LitRPG seems like an obvious source of influences for me. And Moreci is a prominent authortuber whose videos have been helpful to me.

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#456 Post by HuckleberryFun » Sat Dec 29, 2018 10:52 pm

Starting Volume 2. Is it “Fin” for the Finns? Stay tuned.
82445BDF-0BAE-4081-A725-8CE7875937BB.jpeg
82445BDF-0BAE-4081-A725-8CE7875937BB.jpeg (52.25 KiB) Viewed 1052 times
ImageImage

User avatar
YankeeTarheel
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 7115
Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:01 pm
Location: The Jughandle State
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#457 Post by YankeeTarheel » Sat Dec 29, 2018 11:18 pm

Just finished Martin Cruz Smith's "The Girl From Venice" tonight. It's about a beautiful well-educated Jewish girl who ends up in a fisherman's boat in a small traditional village near Venice at the fall of Italy and Mussolini's path to summary execution. An interesting and fascinating tale that falls apart at the end, as if MCS ran out of energy JUST as it was getting really good!
If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything." -- Mark Twain
My son says: "Don't argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!" -- YT

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#458 Post by HuckleberryFun » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:39 pm

No Gods No Masters: an Anthology of Anarchism, by Daniel Guerin
675 dense pages of small type. No pictures or illustrations. This should keep me out of trouble for a good long while.
Or not...
7B3E0C73-4505-495D-827A-1AF46E543877.jpeg
7B3E0C73-4505-495D-827A-1AF46E543877.jpeg (42.08 KiB) Viewed 1038 times
ImageImage

User avatar
Eris
Moderator
Posts: 2602
Joined: Mon May 23, 2016 11:54 am
Location: Houston
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#459 Post by Eris » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:00 pm

Image

Just got this. Not my normal reading fare, but my grandfather was in 8th air force. In fact, the the 4th person from the left in the photo (behind the lead man's right shoulder) may actually be my grandfather. It certainly looks like him, and he did say that the pilot who flew him over to England was a bit older, which matches this photo. Unfortunately, this is the only photo in the book with no description!
88+ recreational uses of firearms
1 defensive use
0 people injured
0 people killed

User avatar
TrueTexan
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 14875
Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2012 7:28 pm
Location: LGC MEMBER: The "Crazy" part of Denton Texas
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#460 Post by TrueTexan » Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:18 am

It would be interesting if the book even mentions the 15th Air Force. So many only write about the 8th Air Force and never mention the 15th Air Force that flew out of North Africa and later Italy. My dad was in 15th Air Force flew as a gunner in B-24s out of Italy in the 461st Bomb Group.

http://www.461st.org

Books I’m reading now RIP Ford’s Texas the Memoirs of John Solomon “RIP” Ford. He was the most colorful man in Texas history. Came to Texas one month after the battle for San Jacinto. Was. A doctor, Lawyer, Newspaper editor, Texas Ranger, Indian fighter, Legistator, Adjunct to Captain Jack Hayes during the Mexican War. Wrote the article of Secession taking Texas out of the union. Negotiated the surrender of Fort Brown and other Union Army forts along the Rio Grande one month before Fort Sumter ad was in command of Confederate Forces at the last battle of the Civil War at Palmetto Ranch, one month after Lee’s surrender and much more.
Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.-Huxley
The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer-Kissinger
Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired.-Swift

User avatar
spittingglass
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 1:58 am
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#461 Post by spittingglass » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:00 pm

About to start a re-read of The Dark Tower series. Well, probably a listen this time through, since I just ran out of new podcast material to listen to. I have a long commute and bought all of them on Audible.

mickel5435769
Banned
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:46 am

Re: What Book You Reading?

#462 Post by mickel5435769 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:52 am

I am reading Comic book and I like brawling go comic book.

User avatar
lurker
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 10040
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2014 11:00 pm
Location: spencer, nc.
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#463 Post by lurker » Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:58 am

mickel5435769 wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:52 am
I am reading Comic book and I like brawling go comic book.
but... what do you shoot?
stupid humans.

User avatar
AmmoAngel
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 23
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:38 pm
Location: N. Central(ish) California
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#464 Post by AmmoAngel » Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:08 am

These are my two reads for February!
Found and ordered the Handgun Guide off the LGC recommended reads... thanks for the suggestion!
Feb Reading.jpeg
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.”
~ Mark Twain

User avatar
spara
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 1351
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:42 pm
Location: San Antonio
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#465 Post by spara » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:34 am

Nomadland - so fucking depressing

Image

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#466 Post by HuckleberryFun » Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:56 pm

As part of my continuing interest in labor history I’m reading...

Wobblies On The Waterfront: Interracial Unionism In Progressive Era Philadelphia, by Peter Cole

I like the part when the dockyard owners hire the Mafia to break the strike by beating up union organizers and intimidating union members so the Wobblies track down the Mob Boss, and beat the shit out of him and warned of more and worse to come. Harassment ended immediately.They were the only union at the time that accepted non-whites and women as full members. Socially conscious badasses, what’s not to like?
6C3020CA-00D6-4F4E-8091-905BA51973C5.jpeg
A century ago the Industrial Workers of the World controlled the Philadelphia waterfront. The rise and fall of Local 8 of the IWW, a predominantly Black but integrated union, is the subject of Peter Cole’s gripping Wobblies on the Waterfront. He follows this remarkable union from its total shutdown of the waterfront in a 1913 strike to its demise in 1922. Weakened by years-long government repression, its end came after a bitter strike in 1922. It could not survive internal disputes, an employer lockout and scabs from the competing International Longshoremen’s Association. The return of the shape-up system of work assignments (depicted in On the Waterfront starring Marlon Brando) to displace the IWW’s hiring hall then ended equal employment rights for African-American waterfront workers.

Working conditions in the early 1900s were abysmal. Before the IWW came along, the shape-up was compared to a “slave market” (14). The labor was “brutal” and there were many injuries and deaths. Safety rules were unknown. The work was irregular and pre-union wages at U.S. ports were barely subsistence.

Housing was wretched. In South Philadelphia’s Seventh Ward, where many Black dock workers lived, W.E.B. DuBois described the conditions in his famous study The Philadelphia Negro. On top of that, the politicians of Philadelphia were among the most corrupt in the nation, as the muckraker Lincoln Steffens made clear in his report “Philadelphia, Corrupt and Contented.” The police were in the pockets of the employing class, whether in shipping or any other industry, and regularly arrested and beat strikers while protecting scabs.

Dock work was the third most common source of employment for Black men in the Seventh Ward, exceeded only by domestic and hotel jobs. African-Americans “were excluded completely from most of the city’s workplaces, notably the city’s many industrial plants…” (22). But on the waterfront the need for workers was too large to exclude Black men, and despite the efforts of other ethnicities, especially the Irish, to keep them out, shipping employers hired Blacks. Employers used inter-racial hostilities to keep workers divided and longshore unions out.

Initial efforts to organize the New York and Philadelphia waterfronts were initiated by an organizer from England’s Dockers’ Union. The idea was to assure that New York and Philadelphia longshoremen would not load ships during English dock strikes. The new American Longshoremen’s Union quickly enrolled 15,000 men in New York. The Philadelphia Local, with some 1,500 men, struck on June 1, 1898 for wage increases and more safety measures and quickly won most of their demands. However, a financial scandal in the New York Local resulted in the collapse of the ALU only a month later.

The Philadelphia Wobblies first organized Hungarian metal workers, then a range of other occupations such as bakers, railroad workers, some textile workers, and even button makers, consolidated into a single Local 57 since there were insufficient numbers for separate units. The IWW had been targeting many kinds of workers on the East Coast by then, but until 1913 had not found a foothold on the Philadelphia docks. The Wobblies did not go out to find longshoremen to organize; rather, as Cole puts it, “the longshoremen found the IWW” (40). The Wobblies were conducting a strike at a sugar refinery when a group of longshoremen approached the strike organizer, who quickly helped them formulated a set of demands. On May 14, 1913, some 1,500 longshoremen closed down the port. Most of them had joined the IWW, and Local 8 was chartered a few days later. Fourteen days later the city’s shippers gave in to most of the strikers’ demands, including the novel idea of negotiating with a multi-ethnic, inter-racial union committee. The strike “ushered in a decade of Wobbly power on the Philadelphia waterfront” (49) despite having to fight off numerous attempts by the ILA (abetted by the shipping employers) to raid and destroy Local 8.


The Great War in Europe was a bonanza for the shipping industry. In May 1916, on the third anniversary of Local 8’s founding, “three thousand longshoremen withheld their labor to honor themselves” without repercussions (68). The Local now included 3,500 longshoremen, 160 sailors (mostly coal shovelers) and the harbor boatmen. Port employers went along with demands for higher wages except for the Southern Steamship Company, which was soon struck. The Company hired strikebreakers and “special officers” to guard their piers. Black and white union men battled replacements, which included Black strikebreakers but even as segregation was increasing in the city, the union’s interracial bonds held. Thousands of strikers and strikebreakers fought in the streets. There were shootings and several men were killed. Mounted police charged strikers and soon “the district looked as if martial law had been imposed” (71). Although the strike petered out, the Local continued to grow. However, when the U.S. entered the war, Local 8 and the IWW faced an entirely new situation.

On September 5, 1917, IWW halls and offices across the country were raided by the U.S. Justice Department. Local 8 and its allied Marine Transport Workers’ offices were raided and masses of documents were seized as evidence of sedition. The IWW’s Textile Workers Industrial Union’s offices on Allegheny Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia were raided by police. Six Philadelphia Wobblies including one African-American were among 166 nationwide (Big Bill Haywood included) arrested for interfering with the Draft and violating the Espionage Act. In August 1918, after a Chicago trial lasting four months, the 101 who had been indicted were all found guilty, based entirely on pre-war written materials which of course reflected the IWW’s militantly anti-capitalist and anti-war position. Two of the Philadelphians received twenty-year sentences, the other four ten years each. “The purpose of the raids and arrests was abundantly clear…to destroy the IWW” despite the fact that their members “loyally loaded thousands of vessels…” (88). The rank-and-file of Local 8 supported the war effort, hundreds serving in the military, which seems contrary to the IWW’s position on the war. No work stoppages took place after May 1917, and ironically the U.S. Navy did not allow explosives to be loaded in Philadelphia unless by Local 8 longshoremen. ILA members were not trusted due to a record of accidents.

The war was only the opening salvo in an all-out campaign by “corporate America and many in the government to suppress the labor movement via the Open Shop and Red Scare” (91). A series of anarchist bombings (including two in Philadelphia), the fear of bolshevism, and a strike wave beginning on January 1, 1919, with the Seattle General Strike whipped up a nativist hysteria begun during the war. This culminated in the Justice Department’s infamous “Palmer Raids” that began on November 7, 1919. Employer groups now decided to put an end to labor unions by stepping up an “Americanism” campaign “equating patriotism with the open shop and socialism with being un-American” (105).


IWW Local 8, with an inexperienced new leadership replacing their imprisoned comrades, faced a growing employer offensive coordinated by the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. The workers demanded higher wages to cope with inflation and a drop in the work week to forty-four hours. The companies refused. The strike that began on May 26, 1920, ”was the largest the port of Philadelphia had ever seen, with close to 9,000 workers out (and) more than 150 ships immediately…idled” (111). But the union could not sustain the strike and after six weeks called it off.

Government repression certainly weakened Philadelphia’s IWW, but Cole insists there were two additional elements in its downfall. “The brutal infighting among pro- and anti-Soviet Wobblies (and) the debate over centralization…whipsawed Local 8 and the entire IWW.” (129). This conflict lasted from August 1920 to November 1921 (chapter 7). In August 1920 the Chicago-based IWW General Executive Board expelled Local 8 for allegedly loading arms intended for General Pyotr Wrangel’s counter-revolutionary “white” forces in Russia. Some Wobblies believed at the time that Communist sympathizers within the IWW “cooked up” the arms story when they realized that they could not “capture” Local 8. Ben Fletcher, the African-American IWW leader, is quoted as saying the Communists engaged in a “Liquidating Program upon orders from Moscow” (136).

By August 1920, the conflict between the rising Communists and the declining IWW was intense. The Comintern’s official policy had changed from a “dual union” approach similar to that of the IWW to a policy of boring from within the AFL. This came after Lenin’s famous attack on sectarianism, “Left-Wing” Communism, An Infantile Disorder (May 1920). Effectively this meant supporting the ILA. The conflict over the Soviet Union spilled over into a battle between Local 8 and the GEB over initiation fees, which pitted local against GEB policies. Despite these problems, neither the Garveyites nor the ILA were able to split Local 8 to create breakaway locals, although these attempts did force Local 8 to compromise in order to be readmitted to the national IWW.

The inflation following the war forced the marine industry unions to call major strikes “only to see their organizations torn asunder by ferocious employer counteroffensives, often with federal aid” (148). Increasing numbers of African-Americans emigrating from the South swelled the ranks of the unemployed, meaning there were thousands more workers for employers to try to recruit as strikebreakers. In October 1922 a cabal of shipping employers determined to break the IWW’s hold on the Philadelphia waterfront. It was decided to cease dealings with Local 8 and lock their members out in order to prevent them from working. On October 27 the members of Local 8 voted to strike. 5,000 longshoremen were now out and thirty ships stood idle. Substitutes were soon available including from ILA members from New York. The U.S. government’s Shipping Board fully supported the employers, even supplying a ship to house the scabs. Within ten days the strike had collapsed.

Cole’s narrative stops at this point. There were still more splits to come, and by the mid-1950s the IWW was scarcely more than a sect. But did the IWW perhaps help lay the groundwork for the direct action CIO strikes of the 1930s? Cole doesn’t say. It would have also been useful if Cole had carried his story forward to the present because the IWW has survived and is engaged in organizing efforts among service workers, as at some Starbucks outlets. But apparently it has no presence in the “blue collar” industrial world or on the waterfront. Today the much diminished competing ILA has a tenuous hold on Philadelphia shipping, battling other unions and employers using non-union labor. Moving shipping from ILA-controlled terminals to non-ILA facilities has been a recent anti-ILA strategy.

The IWW was able to hold on to the Philadelphia waterfront so long as inter-racial solidarity held. It was committed to rank-and-file union democracy, as opposed to the top-down, actually dictatorial structure of the ILA. But during the 1922 strike it was unable to compete with massive numbers of strike-breakers These included Black workers, many of them illiterate, who were fleeing the South’s economic decline and racist practices.

The question is whether even the most militant and democratic union with a sterling record of inter-racial solidarity could have coped with forces far beyond its control. Even if Local 8 had survived the 1920’s, the Depression would have weakened it further. Following the Second World War and the onset of the Cold War, the anti-communist hysteria would have caught the IWW in its coils. It was listed on the infamous Attorney General’s 1950 List of Subversive Organizations even though it barely existed as an organization by then. Finally, the containerization process in shipping decimated employment on the waterfront. This book is a powerful reminder of what a militant and democratic union can accomplish, but also serves as a warning that only a far more powerful labor movement than we have at present can avoid the kind of tragedy depicted here.

**Martin Oppenheimer is professor emeritus of sociology, Rutgers University, where he was a grievance counselor for the AAUP-AFT. He is a member of Central N.J. Democratic Socialists of America.
ImageImage

User avatar
senorgrand
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 18443
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 3:05 am
Location: LGC MEMBER: Calif Central Coast
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#467 Post by senorgrand » Thu Feb 07, 2019 6:31 pm

Save the Cat Writes a Book.
Image

Release the tapes!

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#468 Post by HuckleberryFun » Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:24 pm

The Guerrilla Gunfighter: Clandestine Carry Pistol, by John Mosby

Written by a retired Army Ranger and Special Forces soldier. This is not your conventional firearms instructor text but more about what works in a war zone kind of environment. Part of my continuing quest to read/learn/adapt incorporate or reject new ideas on concealed carry practices and concealed carry firearms. This guy is....ummm....hmmmm...definitely different.
9089E3CE-CCC2-4120-A2F5-4CCC5CE1341A.jpeg
ImageImage

User avatar
RapidButterfly
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:11 am
Location: Salem, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#469 Post by RapidButterfly » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:15 am

Anybody here on Goodreads? It can be a lot of fun...to me, social media at its bookish, nerdy best.
audite semper, semper discendum

User avatar
HuckleberryFun
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 3740
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2016 1:21 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading

#470 Post by HuckleberryFun » Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:55 am

RapidButterfly wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:15 am
Anybody here on Goodreads? It can be a lot of fun...to me, social media at its bookish, nerdy best.
I’m on Goodreads. I joined up recently after I got back on FB after years away. I like LibraryThing better because it’s less commercial and more bookish (more about serious books for adults and less about Harry Potter and best sellers) but Goodreads is more popular and easier to set up. Read through the comments of your intro post in the Oregon room. You’ll find my real name linked with my screen name here. Friend me on Goodreads or FB or both. I’m just keeping these social media accounts for club activities, so posts are oriented towards what would interest members. I don’t do cat pics or memes. ;)
ImageImage

User avatar
YankeeTarheel
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 7115
Joined: Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:01 pm
Location: The Jughandle State
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#471 Post by YankeeTarheel » Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:10 am

"Wolves of Rome" by Valerio Massimo Manfredi. I stumbled across the first of his "Alexander" books 15 or more years ago in the Manchester (UK) airport looking for something to read on the plane home. Was years before he was published in the US, but I've been a fan of his historical (and sometimes mythical) novels ever since. Friends flying over brought me the 2nd book in the trilogy. His wife is his translator, as he writes in Italian.

Just finished a "guilty pleasure", J.D. Robb's latest, "Connections in Death". J.D. Robb is Nora Roberts' pen name when she wanted to start a Sue Grafton / Sara Paretsky / Faye Kellerman detective series without the stigma of being a "Gothic romance writer". The series was very successful before "Robb" was revealed to be Roberts.
If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything." -- Mark Twain
My son says: "Don't argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience!" -- YT

User avatar
lurker
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 10040
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2014 11:00 pm
Location: spencer, nc.
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#472 Post by lurker » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:33 am

spara wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:34 am
Nomadland - so fucking depressing

Image
this worries me. i lived in a van in the '70s for a while, but now there's a tremendous amount of chatter and videos about #vanlife, and i wonder how many are doing it by choice and how many out of necessity, and how many of those will find a way out eventually. we have a new class of poor, often educated, not quite homeless, hiding right there before our eyes on side streets and in parking lots. i may go vanning in the next year just to see the country and will not be surprised if i run across some of these people. because i have a van, what do i need with hotels?
stupid humans.

User avatar
RapidButterfly
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:11 am
Location: Salem, Oregon
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading

#473 Post by RapidButterfly » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:26 pm

HuckleberryFun wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:55 am
RapidButterfly wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:15 am
Anybody here on Goodreads? It can be a lot of fun...to me, social media at its bookish, nerdy best.
I’m on Goodreads. I joined up recently after I got back on FB after years away. I like LibraryThing better because it’s less commercial and more bookish (more about serious books for adults and less about Harry Potter and best sellers) but Goodreads is more popular and easier to set up. Read through the comments of your intro post in the Oregon room. You’ll find my real name linked with my screen name here. Friend me on Goodreads or FB or both. I’m just keeping these social media accounts for club activities, so posts are oriented towards what would interest members. I don’t do cat pics or memes. ;)
i tried a lookup of you on Goodreads and came up empty. Double checked the spelling, even. Maybe my search-fu needs buffing up. Or is it a privacy setting or something...?
audite semper, semper discendum

User avatar
shinzen
Site Admin
Posts: 18646
Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2012 10:52 pm
Location: Northern California
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#474 Post by shinzen » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:41 pm

I do Goodreads as well, but haven't been great about doing reviews

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk

Image

User avatar
spara
Verified Member
Verified Member
Posts: 1351
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2014 5:42 pm
Location: San Antonio
Contact:

Re: What Book You Reading?

#475 Post by spara » Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:49 pm

lurker wrote:
Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:33 am
spara wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:34 am
Nomadland - so fucking depressing
this worries me. i lived in a van in the '70s for a while, but now there's a tremendous amount of chatter and videos about #vanlife, and i wonder how many are doing it by choice and how many out of necessity, and how many of those will find a way out eventually. we have a new class of poor, often educated, not quite homeless, hiding right there before our eyes on side streets and in parking lots. i may go vanning in the next year just to see the country and will not be surprised if i run across some of these people. because i have a van, what do i need with hotels?
It would certainly give a perspective on people who do it out of necessity

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests